Module 1 Telesimenar

Dietary Evaluation Notes

 

When making a dietary analysis make sure your client knows to make detailed explanations about what kind of food they are eating. For example bread what kind of bread? Wheat bread? How much of it are they eating?

 

 A great way to get your vegetables in each day is to try and get at least one salad in every day. Salads are good because you can get 2-3 different kinds of vegetables in at one time, depending on how many vegetables you put on your salad.

 

Drinking lots of water throughout the day is great for you. You can also always add lemon to the water to make it taste better and it is good source of vitamin C and makes your urine more citric.

 

Make sure when helping clients with their diet don’t go too fast in changing everything.  You want it to become a part of their life, not just a New Year fling. Go slow with them to make sure they really get it.

 

It’s important to get the right amount of calories in your daily diet. Too many calories would cause weight gain and too little calories your body wouldn’t get enough nutrients that it needs.

 

 

Vitamin A – deficiency dry eyes, blindness, ruff or dry skin, little bumps on the back of your arm.

Fish oil is very important especially during winter for flu season.

 Bruising easily means low on vitamin C, if your gum is spongy then you could also use some more vitamin C.

Make sure you get vitamin B6, vitamin B6 can cause B12 to be hard to absorb. B12 sometimes has to be injected because some people can’t absorb it through their diet or they can’t get it because they don’t eat meat.

Folic Acid is good to get in your system before getting pregnant.

Poor memory could be caused by lack of magnesium.

Keep your calcium and magnesium a 1 to 2.

It is best to get our vitamins from our food.

 

Poor bone growth or bowing of the legs, soft bones, poor blood clotting can all be deficiency of calcium.

Iron deficiency you can tell if you look at the hand when it is open whether it is white, the eye’s being really white are all signs of iron deficiency.

Module 1 Lesson 13 (Naturally Healthy Community Herbalist A Course of Study)

Lesson 13 Study Questions and Answers

 1.                 What happens when you flush a toilet with the lid open? The whirling water can send up aerosolized fecal matter as far as twenty feet into the air.

2.                 How many bacteria can grow from just one little guy overnight in a moist bathroom environment? In the humid bathroom environment, a single bacteria can multiply to over one billion overnight.

3.                 Why should underwear never be washed with other clothes? Underwear, by nature of their location, usually is loaded with bacteria that may be normal for the person wearing that pair but not normal for the person wearing another pair.

4.                 How do we prevent cross-contamination in the kitchen with cutting boards? Using one cutting board for vegetables and one for meats. Better yet, use some of those nifty new cutting sheets available in the grocery store for cutting meats, then throw them away.

5.                 What temperature must leftovers be heated to prior to serving? Always reheat leftovers to 165 degrees before re-serving.

6.                 What might be hidden in your expensive French Bordeaux wine? Some French wines are clarified with bovine blood.

7.                 What did God make as the best natural sanitizer for toys and other household items? Toys should be cleaned regularly with solutions of soap and water or hydrogen peroxide.

8.                 Why do you need to bother spraying rodent droppings with bleach water and wearing a mask while cleaning them up? We must wet the droppings with disinfectant before removing them to decrease the powdering of the droppings that we could then breathe into us.

9.                 How do you exit a public bathroom without recontaminating yourself after washing up? Use a towel to grab the door handle, then throw the towel in the garbage on the way out.

10.            Why in the world would we recommend folks stay home when ill, and if one must go out, what can be done lessen risk to others?  Staying home when sick is the single most effective method of reducing the spread of disease in our communities. If going out is an absolute must, wash hands frequently, following the guidelines for washing above. Cover mouth and nose with a tissue when sneezing or coughing. If the sneeze or cough hits before you can reach a tissue, direct the cough or sneeze into the crook of the elbow or down the shirt, so that only your own body is contaminated with your germs, then wash hands as soon as possible. Avoid public areas and close contact with others. After touching common surfaces with co-workers or co-transit riders, wash hands. Better yet use some type of hand sanitizer prior to touching to prevent the spread of germs to others. Use a tissue or paper towel to open and close doors. And for community’s sake, don’t shake hands!

11.             What did you find when researching disease among American deer? Did you find any other diseases amongst any other wild game that could impact health?  Bovine Tuberculosis (bovine TB) is a contagious respiratory disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium bovis. Bovine TB can infect most warmblooded animals, including humans. The federal government has nationwide testing of cattle herds to control bovine TB, but it still occurs sporadically in cattle and wildlife such as elk and deer. Bovine TB has been diagnosed in captive elk and red deer herds in several states. The brain abscesses are usually caused when Actinomyces pyogenes bateria enter a wound in the velvet of a buck’s antlers, through a broken antler or through the antler base after antlers shed. After entering through a wound, the bacteria can actually damage the bone of the skull sufficiently to penetrate and cause an abscess in the brain. CAS is more common in bucks than does, likely because the bacteria enter wounds that result from sparring between bucks; according to the studies in other states, CAS may account for up to 6 percent of natural mortality in bucks. If you harvest an adult buck with pus weeping from antler pedicles or eye sockets, the deer may have this bacterial infection. Though the meat may be contaminated with the CAS-causing bacteria, the infection is usually limited to the head. No part of the head should be eaten. The other meat is likely safe to eat, normal cooking temperatures will destroy the bacteria. Hemorrhagic disease (HD) is an acute, infectious, often fatal, viral diseasethat affects white-tailed deer as well as other hoofed animals. In areas where HD regularly occurs, death rates are lower, usually less than 25 percent of the population. In areas where the disease rarely occurs, like here in Wisconsin, death rates can be much higher. High-density deer herds may have higher mortality rates. The disease is caused by either bluetongue virus or the epizootic hemorrhagic indistinguishable with both the viruses. The disease is transmitted by biting flies often referred to as no-see-ums (Calicoides midges). The virus does not survive long outside the insect or the deer host. Deer can display multiple symptoms depending on how long they are infected. Deer that are infected and have the most severe cases of the disease may be unafraid of humans, salivate excessively, have foam present around the nose (sometimes with blood), appear weak but in good body condition and may appear to have swollen areas of their body (typically areas of the head and neck). Dear may also be found in or near water as they can develop very high fevers and be dehydrated. In some instances of the more chronic for of the disease, deer may have erosions or ulcerations in their mouth, be very thin, and have detachment of the wall of their hoof making it very hard for them to walk. In deer that recover, abnormal hoof growth may be noted.                                                                                                                          dnr.wi.gov/topic/wildlifehabitat/deerhealth.html

Lesson 13 Applied Learning Project

 

Why to Avoid Commercial Cleaners:

There are many reasons why you may want to avoid commercial cleaning products. They can aggravate allergies, harm your body, the environment, and can be pricy (though not always). http://minikitten.hubpages.com/hub/Product-Free-Cleaning

Chemicals That Will Do Harm To The Body

Formaldehyde – causes you to become tired, restless, give you headaches, and causes cancer.

Petroleum Distillate – This toxin can harm your eyes, kidney, skin, and nerves.

Cresol – This toxin is found in many disinfectants and can cause many problems. This toxin can cause breathing problems, dizziness, diarrhea, kidney problems, headaches, and stomach aches.

Nitrobenzene – This toxin can cause headaches, migraines, affect your skin, breathing problems, vomiting, upset stomach, and as I listed above even death.

Clorox bleach or any form of bleach – nauseous very fast,  cannot breathe,

http://voices.yahoo.com/the-effects-house-hold-chemicals-their-natural-4130497.html

“Chlorine and chlorinated compounds are everywhere these days. We’re assaulted by chlorine around the clock: when we shower, swim, sleep, put on clothes, even cook…Chlorine -which is an extremely rare gas in nature- has been used as a disinfectant in our water systems, as a bleach in the production of paper and cloth, and as the active ingredient in many different household cleaners.

Mercury and chlorine – The production of chlorine bleach might also release into the environment and into your cleaning products trace amounts of mercury, a toxic, silvery mettal that remains in liquid form at room temerature and evaporates quickly when exposed to the air, making it easy to inhale. Mercury is a toxic substance that can pose serious health risks to humans, adversely affecting the brain, the spinal cord, the kidneys, the liver, the ablility to feel, see taste, and move. If it enters a pregnant woman’s body, mercury can also damage the fetus by preventing the brain and nervous system from developing normally.

Dioxin: it’s the most powerful animal carcinogen ever tested. A chemical by-product of paper bleaching, trash incineration, and other industrial processes, dioxin-which the EPA has been testing rigorously since 1985-is probably the most harmful man-made substance in existence Dioxins, the name for a family of seventy-five different organochlorine chemicals, have been conclusively linked not only to cancer but to many other serious medical problems as well, including severe weight loss, liver and kidney problems, birth defects, reproductive problems in adults, deformities and developmental disorders in children, immune system damage, endometriosis, respiratory problems, skin disorders, and diabetes.

Ammonia – an extremely dangerous toxin that irritates the skin, eyes, nose, throat, and respiratory passages; repeated or high-level exposure to ammonia can lead to pneumonia, bronchitis, and pulmonary edema. The EPA lists ammonia -which has also been linked to chemical burns, cataracts, corneal damage, even skin cancer- as a toxic chemical on its Community Right-to-Know list.

Phenol – also know as alkyl phenoxy polyethoxy ethanol or nonyl phenoxy ethoxylate- is a known mutagen and suspected carcinogen found on at least eight different federal regulatory lists. It’s a skin irritant, too, which can cause swelling and burn skin, eyes, nose, mouth, throat, and lungs. Pral exposure to large amounts of phenol has been linked to anorexia, reduced fetal body weight, abnormal development, and growth retardation.

Butyl Cellosolve – Also known as 2 – butoxyethanol, butyl oxitol, ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, butyl cellosolve is a neurotoxin that can depress the nervous system. This synthetic solvent and grease cutter, an ingredient in many different cleaning products, can irritate mucous membranes and cause liver and kidney damage. In the short term, butyl cellosolve can irritate the eyes, nose, throat, and mouth, in addition to causing headaches, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion, and even loss of consciousness. But the chronic health effects are even scarier. Butyl cellosolve, a suspected teratogen, can damage both developing fetuses and male reproductive glands. It is also suspected of contributing to learning disabilities among children.

Alkyphenolics – one of the most common and dangerous detergents additives is alkyphenol ethoxylates (APEs), a class of chemical compounds that includes nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs) and octylphenol ethoxylates (OPEs). For more than fifty years, these synthetic derived surfactants have been added to detergents, disinfectants, stain removers, and degreasers, and are used in manufacture of textiles, pulp and paper, paints adhesives, resins, and protective coatings…These popular detergents additives have well – documented estrogenic properties, and when released into community wastewater cause great harm to aquatic life, … NPEs also take much longer to biodegrade than most cleansing agents and in fact become evenmore toxic as they break down into simpler compounds, contaminating our sewage plants and damaging aquatic life.” Green This! By Deirdre Imus

Long-term or delayed health effects of household products tend to fall under three categories:, reproductive toxins, carcinogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals.

Chemical reproductive toxins are chemicals that affect reproductive capability and include the following four general categories:

  • Mutagens. Mutagens are chemicals that may cause a change in the genetic material of a cell.
  • Teratogens. Teratogens are chemicals that may affect the viability or cause physical or metabolic defects in the developing embryo or foetus when a pregnant female is exposed to the chemical.
  • Sterility/Infertility. Chemicals that may affect female or male fertility.
  • Lactation. Chemicals that may be transferred from the mother to the baby through the breast milk and cause adverse health effects in the baby.

Fortunately there are not many reproductive toxins found in household products, but there are some. One such chemical, 2-butoxyethanol, appears in a number of spray cleaners, window cleaners and other products.

An endocrine-disruptor is a chemical, or mixture that alters the function of the endocrine system ie in its production, release, transport, metabolism, binding, action or elimination of natural hormones in the body, and consequently causes adverse health effects. These chemicals are chemically similar to human hormones and sometimes they increase their effect with unpredictable results.

Toxic chemicals can also affect our immune system. One class of immune disorders is ‘hypersensitivity’ reactions, or allergic reactions, such as asthma, hay fever, and food allergies, some of which may be minor, others fatal. As early as 1984, the US National Toxicology Program observed that chemical damage to the immune system could result in ‘hypersensitivity or allergy’ to specific chemicals or to chemicals in general. Damage to the immune system can have far-reaching consequences for an individual, leaving him or her vulnerable to attack by bacteria and viruses, at heightened risk of cancer, and even predisposed to develop HIV/AIDS. http://www.cidpusa.org/Toxic%20Effects%20of%20Household%20chemicals.htm

Carcinogens are agents that can cause cancer. In industry, there are many potential exposures to carcinogens. Generally, workplace exposures are considered to be at higher levels than for public exposures. Material safety data sheets (MSDSs) should always contain an indication of carcinogenic potential.

Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that interfere with endocrine(or hormone system) in animals, including humans. These disruptions can cause cancerous tumors, birth defects, and other developmental disorders. Specifically, they are known to cause learning disabilities, severe attention deficit disorder, cognitiveand brain development problems, deformations of the body (including limbs); sexual development problems,feminizingof males or masculine effects on females, etc. Any system in the body controlled by hormones, can be derailed by hormone disruptors. The critical period of development for most organisms is between the transition from a fertilized egg, into a fully formed infant. As the cells begin to grow and differentiate, there are critical balances of hormones and protein changes that must occur. Therefore, a dose of disrupting chemicals can do substantial damage to a developing fetus (baby). The same dose may not significantly affect adult mothers—for a more scientific explanation, see below. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endocrine_disruptor

Toxic Chemicals: Check the “Ingredients” section of the MSDS to determine whether a cleaning product contains toxic chemicals that can impact human health of workers, patients and visitors.

  • If any of the listed ingredients are identified as carcinogens, it would be advisable to look for alternative products
  • Look for any ingredient subject to SARA (or Toxic Release Inventory-TRI) reporting
  • Look at attached links to determine toxicity of ingredients
  • Some cleaning chemicals present particular problems. Examples include:
    • Quaternary ammonium compounds. Long-term exposure to disinfectants containing quaternary ammonium compounds may lead to occupational asthma and hypersensitivity syndrome.
    • Floor strippers and Polishing Compounds. Chemicals in these products include diethylene glycol ethyl ether, aliphatic petroleum distillates and nonyl-phenol ethoxylate, ethanolamine (a known sensitizer), butoxyethanol, and sodium hydroxide. Exposure to these chemicals may cause headaches, eye irritation, dizziness, nausea, difficulty concentrating, fatigue, wheezing, coughing, asthma attacks, respiratory infections, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and nose, throat and skin irritation.

VOC Content: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a significant source of indoor air pollution and photochemical smog . The VOC level should be listed on the MSDS, or the manufacturer should be able to supply a technical data sheet that includes the concentration of VOCs in a product’s formulation. Choose the product with the lowest VOC level.

Dyes: Dyes are sometimes added to cleaning products to help housekeeping staff identify a particular product, and to keep them from confusing it with another similar product, which under some circumstances can have dangerous results. However, many dyes are environmental toxicants, and some are even carcinogens. Some in the medical community advocate removing dyes and instead using alternative packaging that clearly identifies the product to housekeeping staff.

Packaging: Certain forms of packaging can actually reduce occupational exposure to the worker. There is also packaging that works toward environmental sustainability by offering recyclable, refillable, reusable packaging, cleaning products offered in bulk or concentrated form, or packaging made of recycled content.

http://www.hercenter.org/hazmat/cleaningchems.cfm

Module 1 Lesson 12 ( Naturally Healthy Community Herbalist A Course of Study)

Lab Results

 

Client: B. E.

Age: 21

Sex: Female

Marital Status: Single and not sexually active

Wt: 118 lbs

Ht: 5’4”

Bp: 94/60

Pulse: 72/min, with periods of tachyarrhythmia up to 180 with minimal activity; heart murmur, believed to be benign

Complaint: Severe fatigue; chronic nausea, especially in times of physical activity or stress. Poor appetite. Constantly sleepy, even with sleeping 10-12hrs. Difficulty maintaining weight; has lost 4 pounds in the last week. Nonspecific, chronic nasal stuffiness, assumed to be seasonal allergies.

History: Severe premenstrual migraines. Period very irregular, sometimes only once every few months. No hx of hirsutism.

Imaging results: CT chest with finding of enlarged thyroid gland. U/S of thyroid with findings of mildly enlarged right lobe and diffuse very heterogenous appearance with multiple pseudonodules. Vacularity of the gland is quite increased. Some benign lymphadenopathy is noted bilaterally.

Surgical history: Unremarkable.

Family History: Significant for thyroid disease in mother and some extended family members.

Social history: College student, places self under personal pressure for A’s. Negative for smoking, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, etc.

CBC w/DIFF

Result Name

Result

Reference Range

WBC (10^3/uL):

4.5 L

4.8-10.8

RBC (10^6/uL):

4.56

4.20-5.40

Hemoglobin (gm/d):

13.8

12.0-16.0

Hematocrit

38.9

37.0-47.0

MCV (fl):

85.3

81-99

MCH (pg):

30.3

27-31

MCHC (gm/dl):

35.5

33.0-37.0

RDW (%):

12.6

11.5-14.5

Platelet Count (10^3/uL):

279

130-400

MPV (fl):

7.8

7.4-10.4

Neutrroph (%):

51.4

42.0-70.0

Lympoeytes (%):

32

20.5-51.1

Eosinophils (%):

9.6 H

1.0-4.0

Basophils (%)

0.5

1.0-4.0

Diff Method:

Automated

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

Result Name

Result

Reference Range

Glucose (mg/dl);

84

64-115

BUN (mg/dl)

13

8.0-24.0

Creatinine (mg/dl)

0.7

0.4-1.2

Sodium (mEq/L):

139

13-145

Potassium (mEq/L):

3.4

3.3-5.1

Chloride (mEq/L):

101

96-108

CO2 (mEq/L):

29

21-32

Prot Total (gm/dl):

8.6 H

5.9-8.4

Albumin (gm/dl):

4.8 H

3.2-4.5

Bili-Total (mg/dl):

0.68

0.0-1.0

AST (U/L):

22

0-37

Alk Phos (IU/L):

69

30-117

AlT (U/L):

47

30-65

Calcium (mg/dl):

9.8

8.4-10.5

 

 

Additional Tests:

Result Name

Result

Reference Range

Phosphorus (mg/dl):

3.8

2.5-4.9

CPK (U/L):

62

21-232

Iron (mcg/dl):

140

35-150

Ferritin (ng/ml):

57

15-150

TSH (mIU/ml):

3.02

0.3-5.00

T4, Free (ng/dl):

0.75

0.59-1.17

T3, Free (pg/ml):

3.1

2.5-3.9

C-Reactive Protein (mg/dl):

<0.2

0.0-0.9

Sed Rate (mm/Hr):

6

0-20

ACL IGA (APL/ml):

2

0-11

ACL IGM (MPL/ml):

8

0-12

ACL IGG (GPL/ml):

11

0-14

TSH Immunoglo (%):

122

0-129

Thyrotropin Receptor Ab, Seru (U/L):

0.3

0.0-1.0

TPO Ab (IU/ml):

291 H

0-34

Antithyroglobulin Ab (IU/ml):

78 H

0-40

Cortisol, Serum or Plasma (ug/dl: Collected 1:07 pm

4.1

Adults:

8:00 am 8.0-19

4:00 pm 4.0-11

Aldosterone, Serum (ng/dl): Collected 8:50 am

18

Adults: supine 3-16

Upright 7-30 (Pt upright)

Cortisol, serum or Plasma (ug/dl): collected 8:50 am

22

Adults:

8:00 am 8.0-19

4:00 pm 4.0-11

Aldosterone, Serum (ng/dl) Collected 9:20 am

18

Adults: Supine 3-16

Upright 7-30 (pt upright)

Cortisol, Serum (ng/dl)

collected 9:20 am

24

Adult: 8:00 am 8.0-19

4:00 pm 4.0-11

Aldosterone, Serum or Plasma (ug/dl): collected 8:20 am

8.8

Adults: Supine 3-16

Upright 7-30 (pt upright)

Cortisol, Serum or Plasma (ug/dl): collected 8:20 am

18

Adults: Supine 3-16

Upright 7-30 (pt upright)

ACTH-ICMA (pg/ml):

18

06/01/48

 

What could be wrong?

I did a lot of research on all the tests results that came back high or low. At first I thought it could be PCOS. Then I got to the high TPO Ab test and realized it was probably Hashimoto’s disease. It makes sense, since thyroid disease runs in her family.

 

What I would recommend she does:

Be careful not to go over your iodine level, it could cause more problems with Hashimoto’s disease.

 

Magnesium, vitamin B’s, Vitamin C and D are all good vitamins to be taking and making sure your body has enough of them.

 

A Thyroid specialist is probably best to go to just to make sure it is being taken care of properly. If you want to go the more naturally just ask him/her what they suggest for a more natural way.

Medication for Hashimoto’s Disease

Hypothyroidism resulting from Hashimoto’s disease is very easily treated with levothyroxine, a medication that replaces the thyroxine that your thyroid gland is not longer producing or is producing in insufficient quantity. You’ll begin to feel better soon after you begin taking the medication. You’ll need a blood test every 6-12 months to make sure your thyroxine levels are in the normal range, and you will need to take the medication for the rest of your life.

Foods and Supplements that May Help You Deal with Symptoms

The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends eating whole grain foods high in iron and the B vitamins when you have Hashimoto’s disease. Include fresh fruits and vegetables and other antioxidant foods in your diet daily. Fish oil may boost your immunity and L-tyrosine supplements can help you make more thyroid hormone. Herbs, such as coleus standardized extract and guggul standardized extract, taken 2 to 3 times a day may help support low thyroid activity. Always check with your doctor before taking any supplement or herbal remedy.

Foods and Supplements to Avoid

Avoid iodine supplements because they can actually cause hypothyroidism. Iron supplements and soy products can interfere with thyroid medication. Leafy and cruciform greens, such as kale, spinach, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and mustard greens, along with peanuts, pine nuts and millet, can make your thyroid condition worse. Tell your doctor if you are taking calcium supplements, antacids and medications for high cholesterol, high blood pressure and ulcers because these can interfere with your thyroid medication.
Read more: 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/458275-a-diet-for-hashimotos-disease/#ixzz2K4NJnE00ivestrong.com/article/458275-a-diet-for-hashimotos-disease/#ixzz2K4N1e7nc

 

All the different Research I did to come up with this diagnostics:

 

Possible Area’s for Nutritional and Herbal Support

 

WBC Low

When someone’s white blood cell count is low, his immune system isn’t as strong as usual and he’s at increased risk of infection, a condition known as neutropenia. The lower his white blood cell count is — and the longer it stays low — the higher the risk that he’ll get sick or contract some type of infection. (Normal white blood cell counts range from 4,500 to 11,000 WBCs per cubic millimeter of blood.

  • A cough, sore throat, sneezing, or headache can indicate a sinus or lung infection, so call the doctor if any of these symptoms develop.

  • Medications called growth factors can be used preventively before chemotherapy to boost white blood cell count, and they can also be used to increase production of white blood cells when levels drop too low. They contain cytokines, a type of protein, that stimulate the bone marrow to produce more white blood cells. The two most common drugs are filgrastim (brand name: Neupogen) and pegfilgrastim (brand name: Neulasta). Filgrastim is usually given as a series of daily injections during outpatient visits. Pegfilgrastim is given in a single dose. http://www.caring.com

  • If you are suffering from infection, recovering from cancer or blood tests have revealed your white blood cells are low, medicinal mushrooms may help to give your immune system a jump-start. Edible mushrooms from around the world have been found to have a beneficial effect on health, providing nutrients and phytochemicals that support the immune system in the fight against bacteria, parasites, viruses and cancerous cells. Herbal medicine is not intended to replace medical care, so consult your doctor before purchasing mushroom products.
    Read more: 
    http://www.livestrong.com/increase-white-blood-cells/#ixzz2Jxr1aSYX

  • Vitamin A increases the number of white blood cells in your body and is essential to normal immune function. 

    Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/531817-nutrients-to-increase-white-blood-cell-count/#ixzz2JxrbzQHI

 

Eosinophils High

There are several illnesses that look like GERD but are actually separate illnesses. One of those illnesses is Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE). EoE is an allergic disorder in which the cells lining the esophagus get inflamed and become filled with white blood cells called eosinophils. EoE is more common in patients who also have other allergic conditions like asthma, eczema or hay fever.

  •  If Eosonophils is high it could cause allergies.

  • Symptoms of EoE include: swallowing difficulties, chest pain or heartburn, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting and (in children) failure to thrive. These symptoms so closely mimic those of acid reflux that it can be hard to distinguish between the two without accurate testing.

  • Once diagnosed with EoE patients are generally treated with acid controlling medications as a swallowed steroid fluticasone propionate (1). The steroid acts as an anti-inflammatory and the PPI’s help to heal acid damage. Patients then have to determine what allergy is causing the problem and eliminate that food or trigger from their diets. In severe cases of EoE patients may have to rely on elemental feedings for nourishment.

  • Skin problems in Ayurveda are supposed to be due to increased pitta dosha and blood impurities. These elevated levels of eosinophils and monocytes are also the indicators of infections and blood impurities. The impure blood can cause acne, eczema, boils, allergies and many more skin and systemic problems. For your boils problem Haemafine Syrup and Neem will be best. Neem is a natural antimicrobial which clears blood impurities and infections. Haemafin syrup is having different herbs effective for allergic problems, skin infections, eczema, cellulitis and blood impurities. So both these herbal medicines will help body to stay healthy and boost the internal self defense power of body. The immunity of body is increased and many skin problems like acne, boils, eczema etc are cleared. Both these medicines are safe and good for body. One can use these medicines regular for long time as required in case of skin problems. We recommend a regular course of two to three months for complete detoxification of body eradication of boils and normalizing eosinophils and monocytes.http://www.consultation.ayurvediccure.com/herbal-medicines-for-high-levels-of-eosinophils-and-monocytes/

  • Symptoms of eosinophilia vary based on the underlying conditions. For example, frequent wheezing and breathlessness are symptoms typical to eosinophilia caused due to asthma. In case of eosinophilia due to parasitic infections symptoms may range between abdominal pain, diarrhoea, fever cough and rashes. Frequent infections. Abscesses, pneumonia, mouth sores can also considered as indicators of eosinophilia. Few other symptoms of eosinophilia include weight loss, night sweats, enlargement of lymph nodes, skin rashes, tingling and numbness due to nerve damage, etc. these symptoms however occur rarely.

  • Herbs like Shirish (Albezzia lebbock), Turmeric (Curcuma longa), Mulethi (Licorice), Bharangi (Clerodendron serratum), Pippali (Piper longum) are found to be very useful in herbal treatment of Chronic Eosinophilia. These herbs act in synergistic manner and useful in Eosinophilia due to any reason. http://www.planetayurveda.com/chronic-eosinophilia.htm

 

Basophils Low

When Basophils is low it can also cause severe allergies.

Info from Naturally Healthy Community Herbalist A Course of Study

 

  • Iron deficiency causes fatigue and sleepiness.

  • Sometimes fatigue can be caused by your diet if you are not getting all the nutrients you need. Though eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein is important to your energy levels, one way fatigue can pop up is when you aren’t getting enough potassium. All meats and many fruits, vegetables, dairy, nuts and soy products contain potassium, but certain medications such as diuretics, laxatives and steroids can deplete potassium in the body.

  • Sometimes fatigue can be caused by problems with the thyroid gland. The thyroid produces hormones T4 and T3 to control your body’s metabolic speed, and sometimes it doesn’t produce enough, causing tiredness. This is especially a concern for middle-aged and older women.

  • Tiredness and fatigue is one of the warning signs of heart failure. The heart is unable to pump enough blood to all the body’s tissue, and instead, diverts blood away from less vital organs, such as limb muscles. People with this kind of fatigue have difficulty doing everyday tasks like climbing stairs, shopping or even walking.

  • Going to bed and waking up at the same time every day, including weekends, helps your body stay on track with quality sleep.

     

Protein Total High

High-protein diets work by flushing fluids from the body very quickly, which gives the appearance of immediate weight loss. But as fluids leave your body, so does the glycogen stored in your muscles. Muscle glycogen is an important source of energy and losing so much of it quickly will leave you fatigued. High-protein diets also eliminate the complex carbohydrates found in whole grains, which are a vital source of energy and mood regulation. Cutting out these grains can leave you feeling not just tired but depressed.
Read more: 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/230773-high-protein-diet-symptoms/#ixzz2K01EtZId

 

High levels of protein in the blood can be a serious health concern due to the underlying conditions that may have created this abnormality. However, it should be noted that one thing that does not cause high-protein levels is a high-protein diet. Instead, chronic inflammation or infection is usually the cause of high protein levels in the blood.
Read more: 
What Causes a High Level of Protein in the Blood? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5261953_causes-high-level-protein-blood.html#ixzz2K2wTabXA

 

 

High Albumin

High serum globulin causes can be anything starting from really serious cases such as cancer to nothing more than a little dehydration. Some of the most common reasons for high serum albumin causes are the following,

  • Dehydration: Dehydration causes the blood to thicken, causing the concentration of its elements. Test results will therefore show that there is a high blood globulin level while in truth this is not the case.

  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a virus that attacks the immune cells of the body, causing it to become prone to other diseases. This results in a high serum level of globulins, because the body tries to compensate by producing more (immune cells are also known as immuno globulins).

  • Monoclonal gammopathy: Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is where the body produces an abnormal protein called monoclonal protein or M protein. Although this protein is abnormal, it usually does not cause any problems. In some cases, however, this condition can progress over years to cause illnesses, including cancer. It is however impossible to determine which condition will progress and which will not.

  • Multiple myeloma: Multiple myeloma is a condition where the myeloma cells (plasma cells present in the bone marrow that make antibodies) become cancerous and multiply. This raises the number of plasma cells manifesting as high albumin levels in blood.

  • Amyloidosis: Amyloidosis is a condition similar to MGUS where abnormal proteins called amyloid proteins are produced by cells in the bone marrow. These get deposited onto different organs such as the heart, kidneys, spleen, liver, the nervous system, and gastrointestinal tract. The cause for amyloidosis is not known, but it is a very rare condition.

Lately, however, research into serum protein has shown that there is more to high serum protein levels than was previously known. Studies have confirmed that high GV-Globulin levels may be a symptom in the early identification of acute pancreatitis. High glycated albumin levels have been associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and have shown a significant correlation to the presence and severity of CAD. High serum protein S100 levels has been to be associated with the detection of distant metastasis, and mild serum albumin depression and acute-phase protein elevation has been found to be greater in diabetes patients.

Symptoms:

There are a number of symptoms that will point to high serum protein levels, but most of these are very generic and could be pointers to a number of illnesses, including very simple ones that are of no consequence whatsoever. Some of the symptoms that you have to watch out for are as follows:

  • Nausea

  • Diarrhea

  • Fatigue

  • Dizziness upon standing or sitting

  • Unexplained weight loss

  • Fever

  • Tingling or numbness

Tips to Lower Protein Levels in The Blood

  • Eating a healthy diet that comprises of vegetables, pulses and fibers.

  • Getting adequate rest and sleep

  • Reducing stress by practicing yoga, meditation and deep breathing exercises

  • Regular visits to the doctor

http://www.yogawiz.com/blog/home-remedies/high-protein-levels-albumin-globulin-in-blood-test.html

 

 

 

Signs of Thyroid Disease

Bowel Problems.

Severe or long-term constipation is frequently associated with hypothyroidism, while diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with hyperthyroidism.

Menstrual Irregularities and Fertility Problems.

Heavier, more frequent and more painful periods are frequently associated with hypothyroidism, and shorter, lighter or infrequent menstruation can be associated with hyperthyroidism. Infertility can also be associated with undiagnosed thyroid conditions.

Family History.

If you have a family history of thyroid problems, you are at a higher risk of having a thyroid condition yourself. You may not always be aware of thyroid problems in your family, though, because among older people, it is often referred to as “gland trouble” or “goiter.” So pay attention to any discussions of glandular conditions or goiter or weight gain due to “a glandular problem,” as these may be indirect ways of referring to thyroid conditions.

Weight Changes.

You may be on a low-fat, low-calorie diet with a rigorous exercise program, but are failing to lose or gain any weight. Or you may have joined a diet program or support group, such as Weight Watchers, and you are the only one who isn’t losing any weight. Difficulty losing weight can be a sign of hypothyroidism. You may be losing weight while eating the same amount of food as usual – or even losing while eating more than normal. Unexplained weight changes and issues can be signs of both hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism.

Fatigue.

Feeling exhausted when you wake up, feeling as if 8 or 10 hours of sleep a night is insufficient or being unable to function all day without a nap can all be signs of thyroid problems. (With hyperthyroidism, you may also have nighttime insomnia that leaves you exhausted during the day.)

Benefits

Amounts and absorbability of iodine in kelp vary with the species, season of harvest, location and water temperature in which the kelp is grown. Usable iodine content can vary from about 13mcg/g to 3,040mcg/g, according to Amitava Dasgupta, author of the book “Effects of Herbal Supplements on Clinical Laboratory Test Results.” In some kelp species as much as 99 percent of the iodine content is absorbable, while in others available iodine can be as low as 16 percent. Kelp supplements can also vary in their iodine content. As many as two-thirds of commercially available kelp supplements may contain no iodine. However, too much of certain forms of kelp may result in excess iodine consumption and may lead to or complicate thyroid problems. Consult your doctor about using kelp to treat a thryoid imbalance. Kelp may be helpful for treating or preventing hypothyroidism, according to a study published in the March 2007 issue of the “Journal of Medicinal Food.” The study found that kelp promoted thyroid function by increasing iodine and levels of thyroid stimulating hormone, which activates the thyroid. In the study, supplementation with 5g per day of kelp, containing 475mcg of iodine, for seven weeks resulted in a small increase in thyroid stimulating hormone.
Read more: 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/507170-kelp-for-thyroid-disease/#ixzz2K3I4f58w

Iodine: Your thyroid contains the only cells in your body that absorb iodine, which it uses to make the T3 and T4 hormones. Without sufficient iodine, your thyroid cannot produce adequate hormones to help your body function on an optimal level.
Iodine deficiency is typically not widespread in the United States because of the prevalent use of iodized salt. However, according to a nutrition evaluation conducted by the CDC, up to 36 percent of women of childbearing age may not get enough iodine from their diets,
and it’s thought that iodine deficiency is on a slow but steady rise.
Because iodized salt is heavily processed, some recommend avoiding iodized salt and instead getting iodine naturally from sea vegetables (seaweed), such as hijiki, wakame, arame, dulse, nori, and kombu.
It should be noted, however, that too much iodine can actually trigger thyroid problems and worsen symptoms, so it’s important to have a healthy balance.

Selenium: This mineral is critical for the proper functioning of your thyroid gland, and is used to produce and regulate the T3 hormone. Selenium can be found in foods such as shrimp, snapper, tuna, cod, halibut, calf’s liver, button and shitake mushrooms and Brazil nuts.

Zinc, Iron and Copper: These metals are needed in trace amounts for your healthy thyroid function. Low levels of zinc have been linked to low levels of TSH, whereas iron deficiency has been linked to decreased thyroid efficiency. Copper is also necessary for the production of thyroid hormones.Foods such as calf’s liver, spinach, mushrooms, turnip greens and Swiss chard can help provide these trace metals in your diet.

Omega-3 Fats: These essential fats, which are found in fish or fish oil, play an important role in thyroid function, and many help your cells become sensitive to thyroid hormone.

Coconut Oil: Coconut oil is made up of mostly medium-chain fatty acids, which may help to increase metabolism and promote weight loss, along with providing other thyroid benefits. This is especially beneficial for those with hypothyroidism.

Antioxidants and B Vitamins: The antioxidant vitamins A, C and E can help your body neutralize oxidative stress that may damage the thyroid. In addition, B vitamins help to manufacture thyroid hormone and play an important role in healthy thyroid function.

Deficiencies in both folic acid and vitamin B-12 are common in thyroid disease because systems that allow absorption of these vitamins are damaged due to low thyroid hormone production. The authors of “Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine,” Murray and Pizzorno, describe folic acid and vitamin B-12 as methyl donors. Methyl donors nourish the brain in a process called methylation, which allows the neurotransmitters of the brain to signal each other properly. Vitamin B-12 and folic acid are involved with producing the “feel good” neurotransmitter dopamine. Supplementation of these two vitamins has had positive results in improving mood and alleviating depression, according to the authors.
Read more: 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/440891-good-vitamins-for-thyroid-depression/#ixzz2K3Jukz3E

What Not to Eat

What you eat can have a huge impact on Hashimoto’s. Start by eliminating stimulants and chemicals. Some of the more obvious ones are caffeine, sugar and preservatives. The first two tax the adrenal glands, causing imbalances throughout the body. Preservatives and artificial sweeteners like aspartame can cause further stress to the brain so it’s critical to greatly reduce or eliminate your intake of these substances.

It’s also a good idea to avoid some otherwise healthy foods because they can depress thyroid activity. These include broccoli, cabbage, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, spinach, turnips, soy, beans and mustard greens. And avoid iodine-rich foods like kelp. While iodine is important to thyroid function, it can have a negative affect if you’re suffering from Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

This condition has also been linked to celiac disease. Keep a journal of what you are eating for a week to see how products containing gluten (bread, pasta, etc.) affect you. If it seems to be a problem, cut out any foods that contain gluten for a month and see if it helps. 

Tackle Symptoms With Supplements

What about supplements? They can be tricky in folks with this condition since many otherwise safe supplements can interact with your thyroid medication. Check with your doctor before trying any of the following remedies.

There is some evidence that the Ayurvedic herb bacopa can help stimulate the thyroid. It’s also helpful for mood and cognition, which can be negatively affected in those with Hashimoto’s.

Niacin can also help treat the high cholesterol levels that accompany this condition. Just be aware that niacin can cause flushing and even hot flashes in some people. To avoid this uncomfortable side effect, try taking the niacin with 900 mg. of nettles – and take it just before bedtime so that any flushing will occur while you’re asleep. When used as therapy for a specific problem like high cholesterol, the dose is much larger than normal – 1,000 to 2,500 mg. daily. But because of the risk of liver inflammation at these doses, medical supervision is essential.

Other vitamins and minerals are also important. Calcium (1,000 mg. per day) and magnesium (200 – 600 mg. per day) help many metabolic processes function normally. Supplemental essential fatty acids (1,000 to 1,500 mg. three times per day) are also important since they are necessary for hormone production.

One Last Thing . . .

There are some supplements you should not take if you suffer from Hashimoto’s or even garden variety hypothyroidism.

Far too frequently, people with low thyroid levels consume seaweed or iodine supplements in the hope that it will help. However, while iodine deficiency does indeed cause low thyroid levels, taking iodine won’t help if you’re not deficient – and the vast majority of people living in the developed world get plenty of dietary iodine. In fact, excessive iodine intake can occasionally cause hypothyroidism. This is a classic case of “more is not better.”

Soy can also have a big impact on the thyroid. When given to people with impaired thyroid function, soy products reduce the absorption of thyroid medication. In addition, some evidence hints that soy isoflavones may directly inhibit the function of the thyroid gland, but this may only be significant in people who are deficient in iodine.

Finally, iron supplements may interfere with thyroid hormone absorption. Bottom line, it you want to combine natural and conventional medicine to treat Hashimoto’s, check with your health care provider before you self medicate. http://www.advancednaturalmedicine.com/cancer/hashimotos-thyroiditis.html

 If You Have a Thyroid Problem, Take Iodine or Kelp

Nnatural health practitioners who don’t truly understand thyroid function are often quick to tell you that “thyroid problems mean you need iodine” or iodine-containing herbs or supplements, such as kelp, bladderwrack and bugleweed.

If you are truly iodine deficient, iodine may be able to help your thyroid. One study done in 1998 found that over the past twenty years, the percentage of Americans with low intake of iodine has more than quadrupled. Currently about 12 percent of the U.S. population is iodine deficient, up from less than 3 percent in the early 1970s. So, for some people, iodine deficiency may be a factor in their thyroid problem.

But for some people, iodine or iodine-containing products make worsen autoimmune thyroid problems, both Hashimoto’s and Graves’ disease, and cause enlargement of the thyroid (goiter). Before you start iodine, consider having urinary iodine measured to see if you have an actual deficiency, and pay close attention to any symptoms that develop after you start to take iodine. thyroid.about.com/od/thyroidbasicsthyroid101/a/5lies.htm

Thyroid disorders and iodine

It is often said that patients with thyroid disorders including Hashimoto’s disease should not eat seaweed or should eat plenty of seaweed. This is because seaweed is rich in iodine and the iodine contained in seaweed can affect the thyroid gland in rare cases.
The content of iodine varies widely with the type of seaweed. The one containing the most iodine is kelp (konbu) and the content in the other types is markedly low. If patients with Hashimoto’s disease continue to eat a large amount of food in which kelp is the main ingredient, the thyroid gland may become underactive and their goiter may grow larger. However, if the intake is stopped, the thyroid gland returns to its former state. As iodine is indispensable in producing thyroid hormones, some amount of iodine is necessary for everyone. However, in addition to seaweed, iodine is also contained in fish and grains to some extent and there is no particular need to worry about iodine deficiency if you eat ordinary Japanese food.

http://www.ito-hospital.jp/english/02_thyroid_disease/02_5_5life_hashimoto.html

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Instructions

    • Treat Hashimoto’s Disease With Medication

    • 1

      Have a blood test at your doctor’s office to discover the thyroid hormone level in your body. Blood tests will be able to monitor how your thyroid gland is working, indicating whether you need medication.

    • 2

      Realize that with Hashimoto’s disease, your doctor will most likely treat the symptoms, rather than the disease as a whole. Unless your disease has progressed to hypothyroidism, you will probably not be prescribed medication.

Sponsored Links

    • 3

      Take thyroid hormone-replacement drugs to shrink a large goiter. Besides causing difficulty breathing and swallowing, a goiter can be unsightly, contributing to the mental stress a thyroid condition can cause.

    • 4

      Consider taking thyroid hormone-replacement drugs to alleviate some of the fatigue and weight gain associated with Hashimoto’s disease.

    • 5

      Try selenium (iodine) supplements to counter some of the symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease. These supplements have been shown to slow or reduce the elevation of thyroid antibodies.

    • 6

      Treat pain and swelling caused by Hashimoto’s disease with aspirin or ibuprofen. Take it before you go to bed. This especially helps some of the attacks that often occur at night.

    • 7

      Attend your follow-up appointments, so that your doctor can closely monitor your treatment. She will most likely set up a recommended schedule that you should stick to, preventing your Hashimoto’s disease from becoming hypothyroidism.

      Use an Alternative Therapy to Treat Hashimoto’s Disease

    • 8

      Ask your doctor for a natural form of thyroid medication. Most doctors prescribe a synthetic form of thyroxine, but there are natural extracts available that contain thyroid hormones. They are derived from the thyroid glands of pigs.

    • 9

      Consider acupuncture. Some people have had success treating Hashimoto’s disease with a combination of acupuncture and herbal remedies. Consult your doctor before trying any supplemental therapy.

    • 10

      Fill your diet with seafood, shellfish, organic vegetables and iodized salt to naturally raise your iodine level. Also, try kelp tablets as a source of iodine. Iodine is an essential part of the thyroxine hormone, but if you’re not currently being treated with levothyroxine (hormone-replacing drugs), you should not start an iodine-rich diet.

Read more: How to Treat Hashimoto’s Disease | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_2052026_treat-hashimotos-disease.html#ixzz2K4GgRuSu

 

Medication for Hashimoto’s Disease

Hypothyroidism resulting from Hashimoto’s disease is very easily treated with levothyroxine, a medication that replaces the thyroxine that your thyroid gland is not longer producing or is producing in insufficient quantity. You’ll begin to feel better soon after you begin taking the medication. You’ll need a blood test every 6-12 months to make sure your thyroxine levels are in the normal range, and you will need to take the medication for the rest of your life.

Foods and Supplements that May Help You Deal with Symptoms

The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends eating whole grain foods high in iron and the B vitamins when you have Hashimoto’s disease. Include fresh fruits and vegetables and other antioxidant foods in your diet daily. Fish oil may boost your immunity and L-tyrosine supplements can help you make more thyroid hormone. Herbs, such as coleus standardized extract and guggul standardized extract, taken 2 to 3 times a day may help support low thyroid activity. Always check with your doctor before taking any supplement or herbal remedy.

Foods and Supplements to Avoid

Avoid iodine supplements because they can actually cause hypothyroidism. Iron supplements and soy products can interfere with thyroid medication. Leafy and cruciform greens, such as kale, spinach, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and mustard greens, along with peanuts, pine nuts and millet, can make your thyroid condition worse. Tell your doctor if you are taking calcium supplements, antacids and medications for high cholesterol, high blood pressure and ulcers because these can interfere with your thyroid medication.
Read more: 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/458275-a-diet-for-hashimotos-disease/#ixzz2K4NJnE00ivestrong.com/article/458275-a-diet-for-hashimotos-disease/#ixzz2K4N1e7nc

Module 1 Lesson 11 (Naturally Healthy Community Herbalist A Course of Study)

Lesson 11 Study Questions and Answers

  1. Name your top five health care stewardship priorities. Make healthy lifestyle choices, place an emphasis on self-care at home, focus attention on obtaining sufficient information, think about where you health care dollars are being spent, be aware of how our health care system is structured.
  2. When is the best time to do health research? The time to do research and learn is before situations become acute crises.
  3. What is the current structure of our health care system? Be aware of how our health care system is structured- and has been for a long time- under the implicit assumption that only doctors, government, and employers, not you, the consumer, are able to make intelligent and wise decisions regarding health care services and health care management.
  4. Which is the advantage of a durable healthcare power of attorney over a living will? Consider a durable healthcare power of attorney to have a family member in charge of making health care decisions should you become unable and the same for your spouse. With a living will, the doctors will be in control of decision-making.
  5. What should you take with you should a doctor’s visit become necessary? Take a friend with you for health care visits.
  6. What are the benefits to keeping a file of your medical records at home? Keep all the records in a file for each family member. That way, should there ever be any questions, you’ll have the answers at your fingertips. If you do not know what you are allergic to, you could receive the wrong medication.
  7. Who defines the relationship you have with your physician? You define the relationship you have with your physician.
  8. Why is it wise to have someone with you during health care provider visits or hospital stays? A friend can witness what goes on, and serve as a listening ear in case you miss hearing something that is important to your health. These two actions help prevent errors from occurring.
  9. In an emergency situation, who gets the most attention? The one who moans and groans the loudest.

I hope I answered these questions correctly they were a bit confusing to me. It was good to learn how important it is to have a home medical record. It would be a lot of work but sometimes it might safe your life, so I m sure it is worth it. 

Practical Questions

  • Ask your doctor for basic information about the practice or office. Many offices have websites or email list serves that provide non-emergency, after-hours information or a list of resources. In addition, you might be able to go online to make appointments or ask questions of the staff without another office visit.

Health Questions

  • Remember to ask the doctor about each symptom you have noticed, and whether it is related to a disease or is a side effects of treatment. Be ready to ask questions about how long symptoms might last or how they might change, depending on the disease or treatment. Ask about the timing of routine exams, such as annual physicals or mammograms, so that these important events aren’t overlooked. At this point, and throughout the visit, be sure to ask about information you might have read online about the condition or treatment, so the doctor can support or redirect your searches.

Treatment Questions

  • When a doctor prescribes a medication, be certain to ask what it is for, exactly how to take it, what to avoid when taking it, and what side effects might develop. Bring a list of all current medications to compare with the new medicine, and ask the doctor whether any interactions might occur with the added drug. Ask how long the drug will be needed and what should result after taking it. Finally, don’t forget to ask when you should return for a follow-up visit, and whether there is a way to contact the medical staff with questions after you leave the office.

Practical questions to ask Your Doctor

How Necessary is This Test?

  • Many doctors live in fear being sued and therefore institute the better-to-be-safe-than-sorry perspective. Make sure you ask your doctor about the purpose of the test and accuracy of the test. Some tests can have a high false-positive rate, which leads to a different test needing to be done. Also, ask your doctor the benefits and risks of having the test. According to Harvard medical researchers, an estimated 1.5 percent of all cancers in the United States are caused by radiation from CT scans. Ask if there are any alternatives for finding out the necessary information. If you do opt to have the test done, make sure you ask the doctor how to prepare for the test and if there will be any pain. And don’t forget to inquire about how long until you get the results and what the next step will be after the test is over.

What Is My Diagnosis?

  • After receiving your diagnosis, make sure you ask your doctor what this medical condition is exactly. You need to know what caused it, if it is contagious, and how it will affect your life and the lives of your loved ones. Also, make sure your doctor outlines any lifestyle changes that you’ll need to make from now on.

Are There Any Other Possiblities This Could Be?

  • Many medical conditions share the same symptoms, and misdiagnosing is something that occurs all too often. Make sure you are forthcoming with all of your symptoms, no matter how embarrassing or insignificant they may seem. Ask your doctor why she thinks it is this certain condition.

What Treatments Are Available?

  • First, ask your doctor what she recommends for your treatment. If your medical condition is rare, few treatment options may be available. But for more common ailments, multiple treatment options may exist, including alternative treatments that your doctor may be unfamiliar to your doctor. Ask about the success rate of certain treatments, the procedure, the duration, and if there are any risks or side effects you should be aware of first.

How Can I Ensure Treatment Goes as Smoothly as Possible?

  • After deciding on a treatment plan, make sure you find out what the do’s and don’ts are while you are in the healing process. There may be certain foods, drugs or activities that need to be avoided, or maybe some that can be of some benefit to you.

What Are You Prescribing Me?

  • Make sure you know what you're being prescribed and all the risks and side effects associated with it.The ambiguous names of most prescription medications can leave you at the mercy of your pharmacist if you don’t ask your doctor the right questions. Have him explain to you what the medicine is and what is it’s function. Are there any side effects associated with it? What kind of foods or other medications should be avoided while taking the medicine? How long should it be before the medicine starts taking affect?

What is Your Board-Certified Specialty?

  • Just because your doctor has a license to practice medicine does not mean he is qualified to treat your medical condition. Ask your doctor if he is board-certified in the particular specialty of your condition. Only board certification confirms that your doctor has received the appropriate specialized training to treat your condition.

What Are the Possible Complications Associated with this Condition?

  • For whatever reason, maybe you are resistant to getting treatment for your medical condition. If so, ask your doctor what kind of complications you could be facing should you decide to not go through with any treatment.

What Complications are Associated with the Treatment?

  • The road to recovery may likely be a bumpy one and it’s best to prepare yourself for what you can expect. Knowing what to expect can help you take action to counter any problems. It’s also a preventative measure to ensure you don’t do anything to reverse or worsen your recovery.

How and When Should I Contact You?

  • Make sure you ask your doctor what methods of contact are available. Many doctor offices have answering services available for after-hours questions or advice. Find out what constitutes an emergency and what side effects or symptoms would require immediate attention.

Read more: 10 Questions to Ask Your Doctor | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8152719_10-questions-ask-doctor.html#ixzz2IjD5YX8N

Questions to Ask Your Doctor During Your Annual Physical

Cancer Screening

  • According to Mary Pickett, MD., cancer screening is the most vital part of the physical exam as it helps diagnose and treat cancer at an early stage when it is still treatable. So if you have a family history of cancer, you may ask the doctor about what types of tests are available and at what age they are typically performed. For women, a pap smear, a mammogram and breast examination for the early diagnosis of breast cancer should be performed yearly.

    Men should ask the doctor for testicular examination and digital rectal screening of the prostate, including antigen testing.

    People should routinely scan their skin as well, and those who have moles or lesions of any kind should ask the doctors about types of tests they can perform to ensure the problems are not cancer-related.

Vaccinations

  • An annual physical is a good time to ask about available vaccinations. Flu shots for adults working in high-risk environments, such as health care-related businesses, are available. There is also a new vaccine for whooping cough, and according to the Mayo Clinic, the vaccine should be repeated every 10 years, so adults may want to consider a booster shot.

Smokers and Drinkers

  • Additional precaution should be taken by adults who smoke and drink excessive amounts of alcohol. Smokers may want to ask the doctor if a lung screening is appropriate, especially if they are experiencing shortness of breath, coughing or are spitting up blood. Drinkers may ask about the necessity of a liver scan if they experience any belly pain, stomach swelling, nausea, vomiting or rapid weight loss.

    Smokers and drinkers may want to ask the doctor for recommendations for lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise routines and methods of smoking and drinking cessation.

Preventative Actions

  • Even when perfectly healthy, you may ask the doctor for ways to maintain good health. Questions may include: What types of physical activity are recommended for a person my age? What type of diet and which foods would be to my benefit? What types of vitamins are recommended for me at this stage?

Read more: Questions to Ask Your Doctor During Your Annual Physical | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_7463803_questions-doctor-during-annual-physical.html#ixzz2IjEMgXXE

Questions You Should Ask Your Doctor at Your Physical Appointment

Ask During Exam/Test

  • Ask your doctor to explain what she is doing during the examination. This will give you a better understanding of your body and lets you know what kinds of things the doctor is trying to notice. If the doctor sends for any tests to be done on physical samples or scans of your body, be sure to ask your doctor to explain exactly why that is happening. What prompted her to send for the test? What does she hope to find or not find? How long will it take to get results back? What will the test feel like? Are there any safety concerns?

Reference Past Issues

  • If you have suffered from illness in the past such as heart disease or viral infections, ask your doctor if there are any signs of recurrences or worsening of past or existing conditions. If your doctor tells you about any changes to your condition that may be attributable to these illnesses, make sure you understand as much as you can about the situation. Ask how these new issues came about and what you can do to lessen the chance of them reoccurring in the future.

Discuss Current Findings

    • Make sure you understand everything that the doctor has discovered during the appointment. This will help you gain a deeper understanding of the current state of your body and allow you to discuss any new issues or concerns with your family and friends. Be sure to also ask about any test or examination results even if your doctor says everything looks good. This will let you know what your body’s status quo looks and feels like and enable you to discuss any changes more efficiently during future appointments. You should also fully discuss any new medications with your doctor. Ask after the recommended dosage and instructions on how to take the drug. Be sure to ask about any potential side effects so that you fully know what to expect.

      New Concerns

    • Be sure to ask your doctor about any concerns you have with your health. You can never be too safe or too concerned with your own personal wellbeing. If you have experienced any unusual pain in any part of your body, ask your doctor about it. Ask about any shortness of breath or trouble performing any normal bodily functions. You will feel better if something that you hope is insignificant is addressed by your doctor and found to actually be so. Conversely, this will allow your doctor to more effectively diagnose any conditions as early as possible and begin treatment. Tell your doctor about anything out of the ordinary

Read more: Questions You Should Ask Your Doctor at Your Physical Appointment | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8401582_questions-ask-doctor-physical-appointment.html#ixzz2IjH9weMX

Questions to Ask a Nurse

Ask for a visual representation

  • According to Cancer.net, doctors and nurses often use medical terminology to describe treatment and medication. Some patients may have never heard of these terms and do not fully understand the nature of the treatment from the nurse’s description alone. Patients can ask their nurse to show a picture of what treatment they will be undergoing.

Ask about the risks

  • Whether it is outpatient surgery, simple over-the-counter medication or complex medical procedures, some degree of risk is always present. Patients should not be afraid to discuss the risks with a nurse. These professionals can provide some information to patients that help alleviate stress caused by worrying about risk. By discussing the treatment, the patient can better understand how likely or unlikely the risks are, how severe they are and thereby make a better determination about undergoing the treatment.

Ask about the nurse’s training and qualifications

    • Stress often stems from mistrust. Patients may not feel confident in their care provider’s abilities. When a patient meets with a nurse, it is appropriate to ask about the nurse’s training and qualifications. Find out where the nurse went to school and how long he or she has been practicing medicine. Discuss how often the nurse helps care for patients with similar ailments or conditions.

      Ask questions as they come up

    • Patients should be active listeners when speaking with their nurse. As the nurse explains something, the patient ought to interject questions that pop into his or her head to make sure that the information is clear and thorough. Patients can take a notebook in with them during their meeting and write down questions to ask the nurse at the end of the meeting, if desired.
      Read more: 
      Questions to Ask a Nurse | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_7289962_questions-ask-nurse.html#ixzz2IjHVmsi5

Ten Questions to Ask Your Primary Care Doctor

What Does My Diagnosis Mean?

  • Ask your doctor to clearly explain your condition, including causes, prognosis and duration. Discuss the severity of your condition and request pamphlets or resources for further information.

What Are My Treatment Options?

  • Understand recommended treatments and possible side effects. Ask about alternative treatments and the benefits and risks of deciding against your doctor’s recommendations.

Do I Need Medication?

  • Review current medications and supplements and how they will interact with any new medicine. Understand the dosage, side effects and special instructions.

What Can I Expect From This Testing?

  • Find out details of any recommended testing, such as test preparation, how long the test will take and whether someone should accompany you. Know the purpose of the test and what the results will tell you about your condition.

Do I Need To See A Specialist?

  • Primary care physicians often refer patients to other doctors. If you need to see a specialist, see if your doctor can recommend someone.

What Do I Need To Know About Surgery?

  • If your condition requires surgical intervention, ask where it will be performed, the expected recovery time, risks and benefits, and any alternatives to surgery.

Are There Any Changes I Should Make To My Lifestyle?

  • Your doctor may recommend changes in your diet, physical activity and use of alcohol or tobacco. Talk to your doctor about ways to incorporate these changes into your daily life.

Does My Health Insurance Cover What You Have Recommended?

  • Your doctor and his staff are a valuable resource for insurance questions. They can provide guidance about contacting your insurance carrier for further information.

Is There Anything Else I Should Know?

  • It is difficult to anticipate exactly what you will need to ask, and including this question gives your physician an opportunity to add information that may have been overlooked. Ask for written instructions on what you need to do after you leave the office.

Can I Call You If I Have Further Questions?

  • Ensure that someone will be available to speak to if your condition worsens, you experience adverse side effects or you don’t receive test results. Your communication with your doctor should continue after your visit has ended.

Read more:Ten Questions to Ask Your Primary Care Doctor | eHow.com  http://www.ehow.com/info_8266107_ten-ask-primary-care-doctor.html#ixzz2IjK1SCZH

What Questions Should I Ask a Potential Doctor?


Appointments

  • According to Consumer Reports, one of the things you should ask your doctor is how long the typical wait is for an appointment, emergency or routine, and if such appointments can be made online. The Children’s Hospital recommends asking what the hours are for the practice, including weekends. Additionally, ask if same-day appointments are offered, and if the patient will be seen by a nurse practitioner or a doctor for routine appointments.

Medical Practice

  • Consumer Reports notes that you should ask the doctor if she keeps paper or electronic medical records, if this is important to you. Also, ask if they take questions via e-mail, which may save you time if you ever need non-urgent medical advice. Ask the doctor if the practice sends immunization and appointment reminders, or if it is the responsibility of the patient to recall that information. Additionally, ask what happens if you leave a message — how long will it take to get a reply and who will reply. Finally, ask how the practice handles emergency situations, in case the need should ever arrive, and what you should do if you need assistance and the office is closed.

The Doctor

  • According to The Children’s Hospital, it’s important to know about your doctor’s background. Ask how long your doctor has been practicing, how long he has been with that practice, if he is board certified, and if hehas any specialties. Additionally, ask your doctor is he accepts patient input, involving them in the decision-making process.

Read more: What Questions Should I Ask a Potential Doctor? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_7263838_questions-should-ask-potential-doctor_.html#ixzz2IjSz8zIi

Questions to Ask a Prospective New Doctor

Skill and Reputation

  • You want a skilled and reputable doctor. Get a general idea by asking your prospective doctor how long he has been in practice, where he received his training and if he is board certified. Find out which hospital he is affiliated with.

Tests

  • Ask the doctor what sorts of tests he performs. Some doctors test for certain genetic diseases, especially if any of your relatives have chronic or serious diseases. Ask whether the doctor offers screening tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal problems or birth defects.

Your Diet and Health

  • Ask if your doctor or someone at the practice can advise you on what types of foods to eat, what types to avoid, how much weight you should gain and what sorts of prenatal vitamins she prescribes. Your doctor can also explain to you what sorts of discomforts you might experience and let you know when you need immediate attention.

Her Views

  • Your doctor should advice you on exercise, travel and environment hazards to avoid. You might want to ask your doctor her views on natural childbirth and labor induction, as well as her views on breastfeeding, alternative medicine and parenting issues.

Payment

  • Ask how the practice handles payment. Find out whether they process insurance claims or if you do that.

Read more: Questions to Ask a Prospective New Doctor | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_7278047_questions-ask-prospective-new-doctor.html#ixzz2IjTuVhQ3

10 Questions a woman should ask her Doctor

Am I At a Healthy Weight?

  • At least 60 percent of women are overweight, according to a 2007 study done by the National Center for Health Statistics. More than one-third of those women are considered obese. Obesity and excess weight can cause a variety of health problems in women, such as diabetes, breast cancer and heart diseases. Knowing and maintaining a healthy weight is a key component for longevity in life.

Should I Be Taking a Vitamin Supplement?

  • Certain vitamins are important for maintaining health in woman. Vitamin D, found in milk and other dairy products, helps to maintain bone strength. This is important in fighting osteoporosis, a disease affecting 44 million Americans, according to WebMD. Taking a multivitamin supplement can provide you with any vitamins and minerals you are lacking in your diet. Your doctor can help you determine what supplement is right for you.

How is My Cholesterol?

  • High cholesterol is one indicator for heart disease in women and men. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in women, accounting for 29 percent of all deaths, according the Center for Disease Control. Many women think of heart disease as a man’s disease and fail to take preventative measures. Having your cholesterol checked regularly can help your doctor monitor your risk and intervene if necessary.

Should I Be Screened for Sexually Transmitted Diseases?

  • All women who are sexually active with more than one partner should be screened for sexually transmitted diseases annually. Human papillomavirus, or HPV, now the most common sexually transmitted disease, puts women at a higher risk for cervical cancer. Left untreated, chlamydia and gonorrhea can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, which can cause infertility.

What is My Best Option for Birth Control?

  • Sexually active women need to decide on the appropriate method of birth control to prevent an unwanted pregnancy. Talk with your doctor about what option will work best for you, depending on your preference for having children. Birth control options include condoms, the pill, the shot, the intrauterine device and sterilization.

Can You Help Me Develop an Exercise Plan?

  • Exercise can help keep you strong and fit, both physically and mentally. Talk with your doctor about how to develop an exercise plan you will stick with and that meets your needs.

What Screenings Should I Get Done Regularly?

  • Talk with your doctor about your family medical history to determine what screenings you should have performed at your checkups. Cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar are commonly checked for all women. Women with a family history of heart disease or diabetes may have more thorough or frequent screenings. Women with a history of breast cancer may start having mammograms before the recommended age of 40.

Why Do I Have Chronic Back Pain?

  • A majority of women and men suffer from some degree of back pain. Most of the time, the pain is the result of a pulled muscle or aging. However, some back pain can be indicative of kidney problems, lupus or bone cancer. Your doctor may recommend testing and screening if no physical cause for your back pain is determined.

What is My Risk for Cancer, Heart Disease or Other Diseases

  • Besides your family medical history, you and your doctor can discuss other risk factors for conditions, such as cancer and heart disease. Factors such as diet, level of exercise, stress and environmental issues can all contribute to your risk factor. You also can talk with your doctor about a plan to reduce or eliminate risk.

Why Can’t I Get Pregnant?

  • Almost 12 percent of women suffer from infertility, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Age, stress and physical problems with your reproductive system can all be causes for infertility, but your doctor also can determine if other health problems are to blame. For example, undetected diabetes or thyroid conditions can prevent your body from getting pregnant. Treatment for these conditions can eliminate infertility problems almost immediately.

Read more: What Are 10 Questions a Women Should Ask Her Doctor? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_7832804_10-should-ask-her-doctor.html#ixzz2IjDr9ct2

Questions to Ask Your Doctor Before Pregnancy

Health Issues

  • The best time to have a preconception check-up is at least three months before you would like to conceive. Ask your doctor if you have any health conditions that would impact a potential pregnancy. Any chronic conditions–such as diabetes or high blood pressure–should be under control before you conceive. Ask your doctor about the safety of any current prescription or over-the-counter medications or supplements you may be taking during the time of conception and pregnancy.

    Ask your doctor about your immune status and if there are any vaccinations you should have before conceiving. Most doctors recommend waiting several months after vaccinations before you try to conceive.

    Ask your doctor to recommend or prescribe a prenatal vitamin and mineral supplement. Ask your doctor if there are any special dietary changes she recommends before you become pregnant or once you conceive.

Lifestyle Issues

  • Talk with your doctor about your lifestyle. If you drink coffee or other beverages containing caffeine, ask if you are consuming a safe amount or need to cut back. Doctors have differing opinions regarding alcohol; some think small amounts of alcohol–such as a glass of wine daily–are alright until you actually conceive. Other doctors recommend avoiding alcohol completely once you begin trying to conceive. Ask your doctor what he recommends and why.

    If you smoke, ask your doctor to help you quit before you become pregnant. If you are using any illicit drugs, ask your doctor to help you stop, for your health and for your baby’s. Ask your doctor about screening you (and your partner) for any sexually transmitted diseases before you begin having sexual intercourse to attempt to conceive a child. Ask your doctor if there are other lifestyle issues which might affect your pregnancy, such as your work or hobbies.

Fertility Issues

  • Your doctor will take a reproductive history as part of your preconception check-up. This is a good time to ask any questions you may have about fertility, such as “Do you anticipate I will have trouble conceiving?” Tell your doctor about any miscarriages or abortions you may have had in the past, and speak up about any reproductive issues in your family. Ask your doctor about genetic screening or any special risks you might face, such as age.

Read more: Questions to Ask Your Doctor Before Pregnancy | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/way_5289333_questions-ask-doctor-before-pregnancy.html#ixzz2IjPWvIPY

What Are Questions You Can Ask a New Doctor on the First Visit?

Are My Symptoms Normal?

  • Body changes are the first thing you might notice when you’re pregnant. Your breasts might feel sore, and you might retain liquids. You might feel extremely tired or irritated and have cramps similar to those during your period. Some women even experience light bleeding or spotting. Communicating all your current symptoms to your doctor and inquiring about them ensures the best prenatal care possible for you and your baby.

Do I Have to Change My Diet?

  • Prescription drugs, excessive caffeine intake and too much salt and sugar might alter your baby’s development. Asking your doctor about the accepted amount of certain foods and medicine will increase the probabilities of a healthy pregnancy. Many gynecologists provide their patients with a list of recommended food as well as those you should avoid while pregnant and/or lactating.

Can I Exercise?

  • Many women become afraid of losing their baby within the first crucial weeks of pregnancy. Ask your doctor about the exercises allowed during your pregnancy. Most health-care providers recommend moderate cardiovascular exercise like walking or yoga. If you’re into more active sports like riding a bike or running, ask about the risks involved with such activities.

Am I Considered a High-risk Pregnancy?

  • As a result of past medical history, women who underwent cervical surgery, have a preexisting condition or who are older than a certain age might be considered a high-risk pregnancy. Consult your doctor about preventive measures to ensure the successful delivery of your baby.

Do You Have an Emergency Line or Number?

  • Because unforeseen difficulties might arise during your pregnancy, inquire about the steps to follow in case of an emergency. Ask your doctor about a crisis line number or alternate ways to reach him in case of a potentially dangerous situation.

Read more: What Are Questions You Can Ask a New Doctor on the First Visit? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8130673_questions-new-doctor-first-visit.html#ixzz2IjQ1ecQB

What Questions Should Middle-Aged Men Ask Doctors?

Head and Neck

  • The head is an area of concern for middle-aged men. Many conditions that can potentially crop up with age are located in the head and neck region. Men should ask their doctor about hair loss, if it has started to occur, in order to determine the root cause. If a man has smoked in the past, discussingoral health and having checkups to look for tongue and throat cancer or lesions are important topic to cover. Additional concerns which men should discuss include deteriorating vision, any instances of vertigo, memory concerns or loss of hearing.

Upper Body

  • As a man begins to age, his heart may become more erratic and bouts of angina, irregular heartbeats and chest pains may become an issue. Ask your doctor to discuss your current cardiovascular condition to see what you can do take to strengthen your heart. When talking about your upper body, ask questions about cholesterol, abdominal bloating after eating, bowel concerns and problems with urination or kidney stones.

Lower Body

    • The lower body is essential to men for more than walking. The abundance of joints and muscles in the lower half of the body, and ones men use quite often, could pose problems as the body continues to age. Discuss with your doctor any signs or symptoms you have which have increased in severity or frequency, such as knee, hip or ankle pain. If you have pre-existing medical conditions involving joints, ask your doctor about medications or supplements which can help reverse some of the damage associated with aging.

      Overall Health and Emotional Health

    • Middle-aged men should protect their overall well-being, which includes emotional health. Talk to your doctor about ways to cope with getting older. Issues may include concerns about retiring, the physical inability to perform tasks and activities which were common when you were younger and decreases in sexual activity or desire. Ask your doctor to explain the signs and symptoms associated with depression, as this can be a factor during the aging process. Your questions regarding general health and well-being should also include asking questions about suggested dietary and lifestyle changes.

Read more: What Questions Should Middle-Aged Men Ask Doctors? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8667484_questions-middleaged-men-ask-doctors.html#ixzz2IjEo6B73

Prostate Questions to Ask the Doctor

Basics

  • When a man is diagnosed with prostate problems, he needs basic information from his physician. What is the prostate gland and what is its function? What are the symptoms of an enlarged prostate? What is PSA? What is a normal PSA range? What is free PSA and its normal range? Does a rising PSA mean cancer? What is involved with a rectal exam?

Prostate Cancer

  • Concerns about prostate cancer should be addressed to the urologist. What is prostate cancer and its risk factors? What causes prostate cancer? Where does prostate cancer spread? Will diet have an effect on controlling the cancer?

Evaluation

  • Questions regarding the screening process to detect cancer is of great concern to men with prostate issues. Why is a biopsy done and when might it be needed? What is the Gleason grade? Is the cancer localized or has it spread? How is the clinical stage of the cancer determined? What support groups are available?

Treatment

  • There are many options for the management and treatment of prostate cancer that should be discussed with your doctor. What treatments are available and what are the side effects and benefits of each one? What factors should be considered in choosing a treatment option? How do I select a radiologist or surgeon? What is a radical prostatectomy and what are its risks? What is brachytherapy and its complications? What are external beam radiation and conformal external beam radiation and the risks? What is cryotherapy and its complications? What is entailed with hormone therapy? Is chemotherapy used for prostate cancer? What is watchful waiting and its risks? When am I considered cured?

Side Effects

  • All prostate cancer therapies lead to some level of side effects. You will want very clear information from your doctor on just what to expect. What urinary problems can radiation and prostatectomy cause? How can treatment affect bowel function? What sexual side effects can I expect? What can be done for erectile dysfunction? Will I be able to ejaculate? Will I be infertile? Why do some prostate cancers recur? What can be done about a rising PSA after treatment?

Complications

  • If the cancer becomes metastatic, the focus will change from cure to control of the cancer. Your physician should explain what can be done if the cancer has metastasized. What alternative or experimental therapies are available? What can be done to manage discomfort and pain?

Read more: Prostate Questions to Ask the Doctor | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5417288_prostate-questions-ask-doctor.html#ixzz2IjUzvCT2

Questions to Ask a Doctor About Parkinson’s Disease

Questions About Diagnosis and Testing

  • 1. Why do you think I have Parkinson’s disease?
    2. How did I develop it?
    3. Where can I find more information about Parkinson’s disease?
    4. Can it be caused by another condition? If so, will the Parkinson’s symptoms disappear once the other condition is treated?
    5. How will you determine whether I have Parkinson’s or not?
    6. What do I need to do to prepare for the tests?
    7. When will the results be available?
    8. Do I need to call for the results or will someone contact me?
    9. Should I see a neurologist?
    10. How will the condition be monitored?

Questions About the Disease

  • 1. How will the disease progress?
    2. What symptoms can I expect?
    3. If I have Parkinson’s, does that mean my 
    family is at a greater risk of developing it?

Questions About Treatment

    • 1. What are my treatment options?
      2. What are the pros and cons of the treatments?
      3. Are there side effects to the treatments?
      4. How do I minimize any side effects?
      5. Are there any 
      clinical trials I can participate in?
      6. Will my insurance cover the treatment?

      Questions About Living With Parkinson’s

    • 1. Are there support groups that my family and I can join?
      2. Are there lifestyle changes I can make to minimize the symptoms?
      3. Should I avoid certain foods or over-the-counter medications?
      4. Are there relaxation or stress-relief techniques I can follow?
      5. What should I do when the disease begins to affect my daily activities?

Read more: Questions to Ask a Doctor About Parkinson’s Disease | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/way_5347461_questions-ask-doctor-parkinsons-disease.html#ixzz2IjIBeHs5

What to Ask Your Doctor After a Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy Results

  • Ask the doctor if any polyps or abnormal tissue were found during the colonoscopy. If polyps were found, ask how many and if the doctor removed them. Ask if the abnormal tissue was removed and if a biopsy needs to be performed on it to determine if cancer is present.

The Sedative

  • Ask the doctor how long it will take to fully recover from the sedative you were given and when it will be safe for you to drive again.

Bloating

  • Ask the doctor how long you will feel bloated and retain gas, and ask if walking might help to ease the discomfort of the gas. Ask if there are any medications he can give you that would assist you in passing the gas at a faster rate, and ask for medication to ease any abdominal pain that lingers after the procedure.

Bleeding

  • Ask the doctor how long you can expect to see blood in your underwear and in your bowel movements. Ask him how many hours it is safe for you to pass blood before you must call him. Ask if you should call if you pass blood clots. Some bleeding will occur if the doctor took a biopsy, but a large amount of blood could mean the colon wall was perforated or could indicate other health issues that might require immediate medical attention.

Fever

  • Ask the doctor how high you should allow your temperature to rise before you call him, and ask if it is safe to take medication to lower a fever.

Activities and Follow-Up

  • Ask the doctor when you might return to work, sports and other day-to-day activities. Ask how soon he would like to see you for a follow-up appointment and how long it will be before another colonoscopy will be scheduled.

Read more: What to Ask Your Doctor After a Colonoscopy | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/way_5143448_ask-doctor-after-colonoscopy.html#ixzz2IjOoSGlo

 Therapy Research 

Osteopathic Manipulative therapy

Negative effect

Cyriax, former

orthopaedic physician at St Thomas’s Hospital, was

concerned about the osteopathic doctrine of spinal

manipulation for general disease, and pointed to the

vast mass of authenticated evidence for the orthodox

approach to these illnesses, and lack of scientific

evidence for osteopathic treatment. From a Christian perspective, Still’s involvement in

psychic practices, particularly in his diagnostic

methods, reinforce my conclusion that osteopathy is

not a therapy to be recommended. 3http://www.cmf.org.uk

Benefits

the Osteopathic Doctor treats the faulty functioning of body structures such as joints, muscles and tendons. First, he determines where the fault is, then by means of proper manual manipulation releases the body’s own healing powers which then are able to restore the joints or tissue being treated to normal functioning. In the traditional practice of osteopathy the skilled Doctor uses therapeutic touch alone to locate the malfunctioning body part, then gently manipulates that body part using the right amount of pressure in the right place at the right time in the right way. In addition to the treatment of joint or tissue abnormalities, Osteopathic treatment may include advice about posture, work positions, inappropriate activity, nutrition and exercise, or discussion about emotional upsets. http://www.studentdoctor.net/blogs/omtguru/2006/02/benefits-of-osteopathy.html

My Own Thoughts

This therapy sounds like it is a good therapy for a lot of illness. It makes sense that if you put the spine, muscles, or joints in their correct places again they will work much better. They will be able to fight the disease better too. Then again if they move something the wrong way it could cause big problems.

Chiropractic

Negative Effect

Specific chiropractic diagnostic techniques have

been tested for reliability but showed poor

accuracy. 2,3 A larger group of diagnostic methods

used by chiropractors – visual postural analysis, pain

description, lumbar X-rays, leg length discrepancy,

neurological and orthopaedic tests, plus motion palpation – have revealed only moderate interexaminer agreement. It was concluded that these diagnostic tests were not reproducible. 4

Consistency and reliability of specific chiropractic diagnostic methods have not been demonstrated.

Benefits

In 1999 the World Federation of Chiropractors defined chiropractic as ‘a health profession concerned with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mechanical disorders of the musculo-skeletal system and the effect of these disorders on the function of the nervous system and on general good health. There is an emphasis on manual treatment including spinal manipulation or adjustment’.

My Own Thoughts

Chiropractic can be really good if you have a good physician that knows what he is doing. Just like every doctor or physician you might get a bad one. It is good to get recommendations from friends who have gone to a physician and said he is good. Chiropractic can either help you tons or really mess up your body.

Cranio-sacral Therapy

Negative Effect

It is not supported by convincing clinical or scientific evidence and ‘…it cannot be recommended for any condition’.

Benefits

By normalizing the environment around the brain and spinal cord and enhancing the body’s ability to self-correct, CranioSacral Therapy is able to alleviate a wide variety of dysfunctions, from chronic pain and sports injuries to stroke and neurological impairment. http://www.upledger.com/content.asp?id=61

My Own Thoughts

Cranio-sacral therapy sounds relaxing and would be nice after a long day. It is good to release the tension.

Homeopathy

Negative Effect

While many homeopathic remedies are highly diluted, some products sold or labeled as homeopathic may not be highly diluted; they can contain substantial amounts of active ingredients. Like any drug or dietary supplement that contains chemical ingredients, these homeopathic products may cause side effects or drug interactions. Negative health effects from homeopathic products of this type have been reported.http://nccam.nih.gov/health/homeopathy#hed5

Benefits

Homeopathy is safe. Unlike other medicines, homeopathic medicines usually do not have any side effects. Their ability to cause structural damage is Nil. The reason for this is that homeopathic medicines act by stimulating the body’s own defense mechanism and healing powers. They do not have any chemical action, so they do not have the potential to cause any sustained damage. The doses are given in sub-physiological quantities. So they can be given to children and adults alike without worrying about the dosage. Safe for every one. http://hpathy.com/abc-homeopathy/benefits-of-homeopathy/

My Own Thoughts

Homeopathic is great stuff! My family uses it a lot and it works magic. You still need to be careful about taking too much of it like medicine. But if you do it won’t hurt you too bad.

High-dose Vitamin Therapy

Negative Effect

(NaturalNews) There is a double standard in Western medicine when it comes to assessing the efficacy of vitamins compared to pharmaceutical drugs. While medical science recognizes that dose levels affect how well a drug works, the same principle is not considered valid for vitamins. As a result, 75 years of physician reports and clinical studies about the success of high-dose vitamin C therapy has been largely ignored.
Learn more: 
http://www.naturalnews.com/028396_vitamin_C_nutrition.html#ixzz2IkaBUm5k

Benefits

High-dose vitamin C therapy, the kind that uses upwards of 1,000 times the U.S. Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) or Daily Reference Intake (DRI), has been shown in legitimate clinical studies to cure all sorts of illnesses.

In the 1940s, Dr. Frederick Klenner, a specialist in chest diseases, successfully cured 41 cases of viral pneumonia using high doses of vitamin C

Other findings included vitamin C as a cure for kidney stones, cardiovascular disease, hepatitis, AIDS, and even cancer. By administering tens of thousands of milligrams of vitamin C a day, the ability of these diseases to run their course is disabled.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/028396_vitamin_C_nutrition.html#ixzz2IkWN2VCG

My Own Thoughts

Your body doesn’t always get enough vitamins that it needs to function well. When you get sick taking an extra does of vitamins helps strengthen your body to be able to fight better. Having vitamins everyday will help keep your body strong. High-dose vitamin therapy I believe is a great therapy, its giving your body what it needs to stay healthy and fight what sickness you have.

Chelation Therapy

Negative Effect

Side effects of chelation therapy are reportedly unusual, but are occasionally serious. Mild reactions may include, but are not limited to, local irritation at the infusion site, skin reactions, nausea, headache, dizziness, hypoglycemia, fever, leg cramps, or loose bowel movements. Some of the more serious complications reported have included hypocalcemia, kidney damage, decreased clotting ability, anemia, bone marrow damage, insulin shock, thrombophlebitis with embolism, and even rare deaths. However, some doctors feel that the latter groups of complications occurred before the safer method currently used for chelation therapy was developed.

Benefits

The benefits of EDTA chelation for the treatment of lead poisoning and excessively high calcium levels are undisputed. The claims of benefits for those suffering from atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, and other degenerative diseases are more difficult to prove. Reported uses for chelation therapy include treatment of angina, gangrene, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’sdisease, psoriasis, and Alzheimer’s disease. Improvement is also claimed for people experiencing diminished sight, hearing, smell, coordination, and sexual potency.

My Own Thoughts

The Chelation Therapy is for sure good for lead poisoning but with other diseases such as cancer or heart disease it is not scientific supported.

Colonic Therapy

Negative Therapy

There have been cases of illness and even deaths linked to colonic therapy, according to the ACS. Such complications have been traced to the use of contaminated equipment, the perforation of intestinal walls and electrolyte imbalances caused by the procedure. The organization warns that those most prone to possible injury include people with a history of Crohn’s disease hemorrhoids, diverticulitis, intestinal or rectal polyps, and ulcerative colitis. Read more: What is Colonic Therapy?/ eHow.com/http:www.ehow.come/about_5370020_colonic-therapy.html#ixzz2lpUVcPfy

Benefits

Colonic therapy is the cleansing of the colon, or large intestine, to remove toxins that advocates of the procedure believe are responsible for a wide variety of ills. Also known as a high colonic, colonic irrigation and hydro-colon therapy, the procedure uses water, enzymes, herbal formulas and even coffee to facilitate this cleansing process. The removal of toxins from the colon, according to colonic therapy proponents, helps promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the large intestine.
Read more: 
What Is Colonic Therapy? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5370020_colonic-therapy.html#ixzz2IpT3niRZ

My Own Thoughts

Colonic Therapy is currently illegal in some states and the machines used to do it are not being made anymore. There is a big chance of infection when doing this therapy.

Hydrotherapy

Negative Effects

Individuals with paralysis, frostbite, or other conditions that impair the nerve endings and cause reduced sensation should only take hydrotherapy treatments under the guidance of a trained hydrotherapist, physical therapist, or other appropriate healthcare professional. Because these individuals cannot accurately sense temperature changes in the water, they run the risk of being seriously burned without proper supervision. Diabetics and people with hypertension should also consult their healthcare professional before using hot tubs or other heat hydrotherapies.

Hot tubs, jacuzzis, and pools can become breeding grounds for bacteria and other infectious organisms if they are not cleaned regularly, maintained properly, kept at the appropriate temperatures, and treated with the proper chemicals. Individuals should check with their healthcare provider to ensure that the hydrotherapy equipment they are using is sanitary. Those who are using hot tubs and other hydrotherapy equipment in their homes should follow the directions for use and maintenance provided by the original equipment manufacturer.

Benefits

Hydrotherapy can soothe sore or inflamed muscles and joints, rehabilitate injured limbs, lower fevers, soothe headaches, promote relaxation, treat burns and frostbite, ease labor pains, and clear up skin problems. The temperature of water used affects the therapeutic properties of the treatment. Hot water is chosen for its relaxing properties. It is also thought to stimulate the immune system. Tepid water can also be used for stress reduction, and may be particularly relaxing in hot weather. Cold water is selected to reduce inflammation. Alternating hot and cold water can stimulate the circulatory system and improve the immune system. Adding herbs and essential oils to water can enhance its therapeutic value. Steam is frequently used as a carrier for essential oils that are inhaled to treat respiratory problems. http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/hydrotherapy

My Own Thoughts

Hydrotherapy or water therapy is a good remedy for fevers, soothe headaches, promote relaxation, treats burns and frostbite, helps with lots of other things too. We just need to be very careful when doing hydrotherapy because a lot of diseases easily travel by water.

Massage Therapy

Negative Effect

Getting a professional massage is generally a safe and enjoyable experience. There are some situations in which side effects have been experienced after a massage, however. Often, these negative effects are minor and subside within a day or two. Those with certain medical conditions or who take some medications may be at greater risk for more serious complications, although these are still rare. The most common side effect reported after a professional massage was an increase in soreness or discomfort following the massage. In more rare cases, headache, fatigue or bruising have also been reported, reports the website Annieappleseedproject.org. There are certain medical conditions that can make serious side effects more likely. For instance, those with osteoporosis have a greater chance of having bone damage or even fractures from heavy pressure during massage, as their bones are weaker and more brittle. Cancer patients should also be cautious about receiving massage, as cancer treatments can make tissue more fragile and easier to damage during massage. Other conditions that should make people avoid massage are blood clots, bleeding disorders, heart or kidney failure, and any contagious skin conditions, states the University of Maryland Medical Center.
Read more: 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/135207-negative-effects-massage-therapy/#ixzz2Iw3txYBo

Benefits

Massage therapy is more than relaxing me-time. Studies continue to prove the physical, and emotional benefits of even a single massage therapy session. As the number of proven health benefits grows, so do the number of Americans who turn to Massage Envy for a more balanced lifestyle. Massage therapy helps relieve stress, encourages relaxation, improves posture, improves circulation, lowers blood pressure, relaxes muscles. Improves flexibility and range of motion, promotes deeper and easier breathing, relieves headaches, strengthens the immune system, enhances post-operative rehabilitation, and improves rehabilitation after injury. http://www.massageenvy.com/benefits-of-massage-therapy.aspx

My Own Thoughts

Massage therapy is safe for most people, there’s always some people though that it wouldn’t be very good for them. Massaging and the relaxation of your body is sometimes what your body needs to feel so much better. After a stressful day, having a massage to relax your muscles and take the tension away from them is wonderful for them.

Aromatherapy

Negative Effect

Pregnant women, people with severe asthma, and people with a history of allergies should only use essential oils under the guidance of a trained professional and with full knowledge of your physician. Pregnant women and people with a history of seizures should avoid hyssop oil.

People with high blood pressure should avoid stimulating essential oils, such as rosemary and spike lavender.

People with estrogen dependent tumors (such as breast or ovarian cancer) should not use oils with estrogen like compounds such as fennel, aniseed, sage, and clary-sage.

People receiving chemotherapy should talk to their doctor before trying aromatherapy.
Source: 
http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/aromatherapy-000347.htm#ixzz2IwDR6CdW 

Benefits

When a YLTG essential oil is diffused, it’s inhaled and processed through the olfactory system, which then sends the therapeutic benefits of the aroma to the brain. Depending on the specific constituents in the oil, you may begin to feel the release of negative emotions, the soothing of undue muscle tension, or experience the cleansing effect of the oils as your body eliminates toxins. http://www.youngliving.com/en_US/wellness/aromatherapy.html

The ancient Chinese, Indians, Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans used them in cosmetics, perfumes, and drugs. Essential oils were also commonly used for spiritual, therapeutic, hygienic, and ritualistic purposes. a French chemist, discovered the healing properties of lavender oil when he applied it to a burn on his hand caused by an explosion in his laboratory. He then started to analyze the chemical properties of essential oils and how they were used to treat burns, skin infections, gangrene, and wounds in soldiers during World War I. In general, it seems to relieve pain, improve mood, and promote a sense of relaxation. In fact, several essential oils – including lavender, rose, orange, bergamot, lemon, sandalwood, and others — have been shown to relieve anxiety, stress, and depression.

Source: http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/aromatherapy-000347.htm#ixzz2IwALcIbC 

My Own Thoughts

Aromatherapy has been around for a pretty long time and is still being used around the world. Those of you who have allergies or pregnant should be careful when using essential oils. I always think that if its natural and it works then its better to use that than some drug.  

What to include in your personal medical record:

  • You’ll need your health records if you change doctors, move, get sick when you’re away from home, or end up in an emergency room. If any of these things happen and you have your records, you may get treatment more quickly and it will be safer.
  • Include variety of types of “notes” entered over time by health care professionals, recording observations and administration of drugs and therapies, orders for the administration of drugs and therapies, test results, x-rays, reports, etc.

Here are some tips for creating your personal medical history:

  • Ask for a copy of your medical records from your doctor’s office.
  • Keep a medical journal with things such as when you went to the doctor, what was said, what you were sick with, what medicine you were given and how much.
  • It would be safe to have a record of your family members that include what diseases they had or what is common in your family.

Organizing and storing your personal medical record:

  • After you have your information, you need to organize it. Here are some ideas:
  • Use a 3-ring binder or wire-bound notebook with dividers for each member of the family. If you get a notebook with pockets, you can keep test results and other health papers in these pockets.
  • Create a file on your computer with your information. Create the file in any software program you feel comfortable using.
  • Use software that creates a personal health record.
  • Keep all information in a safe place!
  • Store your health records on a secure Internet site. Your health plan or hospital may have one. 

What to keep as illness records to take in when seeking outside help:

  • Bring important records with you which should include your recent laboratory test results, a current list of your present and past diagnoses, and a current medication list based on the medicines you are presently taking and how often you take your pills. Every piece of information is a clue to making a diagnosis.
  • You should keep a list of your over the counter medications, alternative therapies, and vitamins.
  • You should bring your records to the appointment.
  • Bring a friend if possible, it’s always good to have more than one pair of ears listening.  

Some online resources for researching health topic, drugs, vitamins/minerals, finding doctors, dentists, and hospitals: http://www.health-alternatives.com/ http://symptom.healthline.com/symptomsearch?subtractterm=all http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/http://www.iherb.com

http://www.drweil.com

Module 1 Lesson 10 (Naturally Healthy Community Herbalist A Course of Study)

Lesson 10 Study Questions and Answers

  1. When evaluating family members, is more or less information helpful to targeting therapies to specific needs? More information is helpful to target therapies to specific needs.
  2. What are some of the first and easiest dietary changes an herbalist could suggest to a client? Analyzing the diet is quite simple. After the one-week food diary is complete, I merely go through the diet sheets highlighting all red flag areas. I then make recommendations for change based on the Whole Foods for Whole Health Healthy Substitutions Chart.
  3. List all seven red flags one should circle right away on a client’s dietary intake sheet: 1. Enriched Flour in ingredients list: Flour must first be depleted in order for it to have to be enriched. 2. Amount of processing involved in food. The more processing, the more nutrients lost. 3. Preservatives: BHT, BHA, sodium nitraite and nitrate, propyl gallate, sulfur dioxide, and sodium bisulfate. Just why is it even bacteria won’t touch the stuff? 4. Caffeine, alcohol, tobacco. All deplete the body of ESSENTIAL nutrients. 5. Artificial coloring: Esp., FD&C Red No. 1, Orange B, Red No. 3, Red No. 40, Yellow No. 5, Blue No. 1 and Blue No. 2 and artificial flavorings: MSG (if you are allergic), quinine. 6. Chemicals of any kind, particularly artificial sweeteners: Saccharine, aspartame. 7. Natural additives: sorbitol.
  4. What type of food is the most important to recommend increasing in one’s diet? Whole grains, complex carbohydrates, including legumes- 9-11 servings, Fruits and Vegetables – 5-9 servings, Meat – 1-2 servings, Oils, Fats – 5-7 small servings of good fats.
  5. Every hour of sleep prior to midnight counts as how many after? Each hour of sleep gotten before 12:00midnight counts as two hours of post-midnight sleep.
  6. How many steps do we need to walk a day for health? Simple walking can do a body a world of good; 10,000 steps a day is a good goal for health.
  7. What are the primary body areas we look into with lagging energy levels? After ascertaining that good foods are eaten, adequate water is consumed, sleep is restful and exercise is regular, other investigation may be required such as: thyroid panel, hemoglobin values, underlying infectious process checked out, adrenal function, and maybe even a pregnancy test.
  8. In general, good bowel elimination is one bowel movement per each: every time we eat a meal per day (three meals would equal three b.m’s).
  9. For effectively washing germs off hands, what is required? We need to wash for at least 10-15 seconds with soap under warm water.
  10. Look up some biblical references for lessening anxiety, merry hearts, joy in the Lord, etc. to be able to draw upon when counseling clients. List references. Perhaps copy one in a pretty way: drawing, coloring, needlepoint, cross-stitch, print it from your computer using a pretty font and colors. Memorize another of those verses. Do you know any hymns or scripture songs with any of those verses? Proverbs 12:25Anxiety in the heart of man causes depression, but a good word makes it glad.”, Phil. 4:6 “ Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God;”, Ezekel 12:19 “ And say to the people of the land, “ Thus says the Lord God to the inhabitants of Jerusalem and to the land of Israel: “ They shall eat their bread with anxiety, and drink their water with dread, so that her land may be emptied of all who are in it, because of the violence of all those who dwell in it.” Psalm 94:19 “ In the multitude of my anxieties within me, Your comforts delight my soul.” Psalm 139:23 “ Search me, O God, and know my heart; Try me and know my anxieties;” Luke 12: 29 “ And do notseek what you should eat or what you should drink, nor have an anxious mind.” In the Bible it clearly says not to be anxious. It isn’t good for the body or heart, if we are anxious we aren’t trusting God enough. Proverbs 15:13 “ A merry heart makes a cheerful countenance, but by sorrow of the heart the spirit is broken.” Ecclesiastes 8:15 “ So I commended enjoyment, because a man has nothing better under the sun than to eat, drink and be merry; for this will remain with him in his labor all the days of his life which God gives him under the sun.” Luke 15:32 “ It was right that we should make merry and be glad, for your brother was dead and is alive again, and was lost and is found.” Being merry is always good for the heart, soul and body. There’s so many verses about joy, just shows that we are suppose to have a joyful countenance about us. John 17:13 “ But now I come to You, and these things I speak in the world, that they may have My joy fulfilled in themselves.” Romans 15:13 “ Now may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” Rejoice in the Lord Always and Again I Say Rejoice is a great joy song to remember. 
Page’s Dietary Analysis Sheet  Healthy Version
Day One (Wednesday):

Breakfast: 1 small pancake with 2 tbs syrup, 1 cup water,

Mid-morning snack: apple, 3 slices of cheese, strip dried fruit,

Lunch: Bowl chicken noodle (white) soup, 2 slices of cheese, salad with 2 baby carrots, 2 slices of tomatoes, 1 slice Mozzarella Cheese, 1 tbs olive oil, 2 tsp red wine vinegar, 1 cup water,

Afternoon Snack: 1 cup water

Dinner: 1 bowl potato bacon soup, soup crackers (white flour), salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, pecan baklava, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack: 1 cup water

Day Two (Thursday):

Breakfast: Blueberry bar, 1 bowl chicken noodle soup (white flour), 1 cup water,

Mid-morning: Dried pineapple, sugar covered almonds, 1 cup water,

Lunch: 1 can vegetable soup, 1 cup water,

Afternoon Snack: Dried pineapple, baby carrots, all natural licorice,

Dinner: Beef stroganoff wheat noodles, cooked carrots, coffee ice cream, salad, pecan baklava, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack: dried cranberries, 1 cup water,

Day Three (Friday):

Breakfast: oatmeal with brown sugar and cinnamon, cup tea, 1 cup water

Mid-morning: dried cranberries, all natural licorice, baby carrots with cream cheese, 1 cup water

Lunch: canned pineapple and fresh apple fruit salad, beef stroganoff, wheat noodles, 1 cup water

Afternoon Snack: pecan baklava, cheese nips, dried fruit, small bowl venison stew,

Dinner: nachos, fried pickles, fried onions, 3 cups of water,

Bedtime Snack: hot chocolate,

Day Four(Saturday):

Breakfast: half white flour waffle,

Mid-morning: fried onions,

Lunch:

Afternoon Snack: Homemade mango salsa and corn chips,

Dinner: piece turkey, baked potato with sour cream and butter, green beans, small brownie, 1 cup water

Bedtime Snack:

Day Five(Sunday):

Breakfast: chocolate chip scone,

Mid-morning:

Lunch: potato soup, ham, homemade mango salsa and corn chips, 1 cup water

Afternoon Snack: chocolate chips, 1 cup water

Dinner: small bowl of potato soup, 3 bites potato salad, salad, bite of pudding, 1 cup water

Bedtime Snack: chocolate chips, 1 cup of water,

 

Day One(Wednesday):

Breakfast: 1 whole wheat pancake with 100% pure Maple Syrup, 1 cup water

Mid-morning snack: Apple, 3 slices of cheese, strip dried fruit,

Lunch: Bowl chicken noodle (whole wheat) soup, 2 slices of cheese, salad with 2 baby carrots, 2 slices of tomatoes, 1 slice Mozzarella cheese, 1 tbs olive oil, 2 tsp red wine vinegar, 1 cup water

Afternoon snack: fruit is always great for an afternoon snack, 1 cup water,

Dinner: 1 bowl potato bacon soup, wheat crackers or no crackers, salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, homemade dressing, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack: piece of fruit and a cup water,

Day Two(Thursday):

Breakfast: Piece of fruit, bowl chicken noodle soup (whole wheat noodles), 1 cup water,

Mid-morning: Dried pineapple, salted covered almonds, 1 cup water,

Lunch: 1 bowl homemade vegetable soup, 1 cup water,

Afternoon Snack: Dried pineapple, baby carrots, all natural licorice,

Dinner: Beef stroganoff whole wheat noodles, cooked carrots, 1 cup water, piece of fruit for desert,

Bedtime Snack: Dried cranberries, 1 cup water,

Day Three (Friday):

Breakfast: Oatmeal with fresh blueberries, cup tea, 1 cup water,

Mid-morning: Dried cranberries, all natural licorice, baby carrots with cream cheese, 1 cup water,

Lunch: fresh pineapple and fresh apple fruit salad, beef stroganoff, wheat noodls, 1 cup water,

Afternoon Snack: Dried fruit, small bowl venison stew, fresh fruit,

Dinner: Nachos with fresh melted cheese, fresh pickles, 3 cups water,

Bedtime Snack: Cup of tea,

Day Four(Saturday):

Breakfast: Half whole wheat waffle, 1 cup water,

Mid-morning: Fresh fruit,

Lunch: Salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, sunflower seeds, green peppers,

Afternoon Snack: Homemade mango salsa and corn chips,

Dinner: Piece turkey, baked potato with sour cream and raw butter, green beans, piece of fruit, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack: cup of whole milk,

Day Five(Sunday):

Breakfast: Apple and cheese,

Mid-morning: piece of fruit

Lunch: potato soup, ham, homemade mango salsa and corn chips, 1 cup water

Afternoon Snack: Piece of fruit, Dark chocolate chips, 1 cup water,

Dinner: small bowl potato soup, 3 bites potato salad salad, piece of fruit, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack: Dark chocolate chips, 1 cup water,

 

Olivia’s Dietary Analysis Sheet Healthy version
Day One (Wednesday):

Breakfast: 1 cup lowfat yogurt, ½ cup flaxseed meal, ½ cup bluberries, small apple, cup pear juice, cup of chamomile tea,

Mid-morning snack: 1 tortilla with half tomato, ½ cup cheese and salad,

Lunch: 1 tortilla with half tomato, ½ cup cheese and salad,

Afternoon Snack: 2 pieces chocolate,

Dinner: 1 bowl potato soup bacon soup, salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, pecan baklava, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack:

Day Two (Thursday):

Breakfast: apple, 2 pancakes,

Mid-morning: soy crisps,

bottle of water finished

Lunch: sandwich, granola bar,

Afternoon Snack: Dried pineapple,

bottle of water finished

Dinner: soup, 1 piece pecan baklava, ½ cup ½ fat vanilla ice cream,

Bedtime Snack:

bottle of water finished

Day Three (Friday):

Breakfast: soup, ½ cup lowfat yogurt,

Mid-morning: rice cake with peanut butter, cup of juice,

Lunch: fruit and salad, 1 cup water,

Afternoon Snack: 2 chocolate chip cookies,

Dinner: fried pickles, venison stew, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack: nachos, cup of water,

Day Four(Saturday):

Breakfast: 1 white flour waffle,

Mid-morning: fried onions,

Lunch: apple

Afternoon Snack:

Dinner: green beans, yam, mango salsa and chips,1 cup water

Bedtime Snack:

Day Five(Sunday):

Breakfast: 1 egg, yam,

Mid-morning:

Lunch: cake, chicken lasagna, chips and mango salsa, 1 cup water

Afternoon Snack: chocolate chips, 1 cup water

Dinner: chicken lasagna, chocolate chip cookie, 1 cup water

Bedtime Snack: chocolate chips, 1 cup of water,

Day One( Wednesday):

Breakfast: 1 cup low fat yogurt, ½ cup flaxseed meal, ½ cup blueberries, small apple, cup pear juice, cup of chamomile tea,

Mid-morning snack: 1 wheat tortilla, with half tomato, ½ cup cheese and salad,

Lunch: 1 wheat tortilla with half tomato, ½ cup cheese and salad,

Afternoon Snack: piece of fruit,

Dinner: 1 bowl potato bacon soup, salad with tomatoes, cucumber, fruit pop-sickles, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack:

Day Two(Thursday):

Breakfast: apple, 2 whole wheat pancakes,

Mid-morning Snack: soy crisps,

bottle of water finished

Lunch: sandwich with whole wheat bread, granola bar, piece of fruit,

Afternoon Snack: Dried pineapple,

bottle of water finished

Dinner: soup, frozen yogurt (½ cup low-fat cottage cheese
1 tbsp flaxseeds
½ scoop vanilla or berry flavoured protein powder
¼ cup oats
¼ cup low-sugar frozen yogurt
¼ cup berries )

Bedtime Snack:

bottle of water finished

Day Three(Friday):

Breakfast: soup, ½ cup low fat yogurt,

Mid-morning Snack: Rice cake with peanut butter, cup of juice,

Lunch: fruit and salad, 1 cup water,

Afternoon Snack: 2 Protein Oatmeal Cookies (1 cup ground oats
1 cup rolled oats
¼ cup Splenda (or another sweetener)
½ cup vanilla protein powder
1 cup unsweetened applesauce
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp vanilla extract
4 egg whites
½ cup water )

Dinner: fresh pickles, venison stew, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack: Nachos with real melted cheese, 1 cup water

Day Four(Saturday):

Breakfast: 1 wheat flour waffle,

Mid-morning Snack: piece of fruit,

Lunch: Apple, with cheese or peanut butter,

Afternoon Snack: piece of fruit and a vegetable,

Dinner: Green beans, yam, homemade mango salsa and corn chips, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack:

Day Five(Sunday):

Breakfast: 1 egg, yam,

Mid-morning snack:

Lunch: Chocolate peanut butter pie (4 tbsp natural peanut butter
1 tbsp sugar free syrup
1 ½ cups rice crispy cereal
1 package sugar-free, fat free chocolate pudding powder
1 ½ cups skim milk), Chicken lasagna, homemade mango salsa and corn chips, 1 cup water,

Afternoon snack: dark chocolate chips, 1 cup water,

Dinner: Chicken lasagna, Dark chocolate chips, 1 cup water,

Bedtime Snack: Dark chocolate chips, 1 cup water,

Olivia and I talked about how we could make our diet better for you. I was willing to give up deserts and have fruit instead. Olivia didn’t like that idea too much. So I looked up some healthy desert ideas and added them to the healthy version side. 

Module 1 Lesson 9 (Naturally Healthy Community Herbalist A Course of Study)

Lesson 9 Study Questions and Answers

  1. What are the primary reasons for stocking your pantry? The obvious overall benefits of a well-stocked pantry is having food on hand when it is needed. Having a pantry helps organize menu planning. Buying for the pantry saves money. Entertaining unexpected guest or handling a hard day becomes easier with a pantry when the need is there, so is the pantry.
  2. What are the guidelines for short-term and long-term storage? One of the first things to get up a pantry is figuring out what your family eats on a regular basis. Some helpful items to keep on hand that make the job easier are glass jars in different sizes such as canning jars or heavy-duty plastic containers in various sizes. Go at your own pace as your budget allows. A pantry can be in any place away from light, heat, moisture, and extreme temperature change.
  3. What are the four enemies of storage items? These are the same enemies of our herbal medicines, too. A pantry’s worst enemies are moisture or humidity, mold, heat, light, oxygen, predators and age.
  4. What are some egg substitute options for when you are out of eggs or someone is allergic to eggs? There are several good egg replacers available and due to space, I will only after a few ideas at present: flax seed, soy flour blended with water, silken tofu, fruit purees (particularly pureed plums), a powdered commercial egg replacer such as Ener-G, or the homemade versions, can all be used to replace eggs.
  5. What are the main points to remember when making dietary changes? Why would these be important for you or your clients? Some of the main points to remember when making dietary changes is to remember Genenis 1:29-30. We must always give the glory to God and not take it for ourselves. We should always take great pleasure in our food Luke 14:15, 15:22-23. we need to always make God the most important part of our life not food or our health, Matthew 6:32-33, 22:37-40. Whatever we do or eat will not make us holy only God has that power, Matthew 15:10-11, Colossians 2:16. 

Menu With Enough Vitamins and Minerals

Sunday:

Breakfast; ¼ cup Steel-Cut Oats Calories 150, Fat 2.0g, Carbs 26.0g, Protein 4.0g, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Potassium, Phosphorus, Sodium, Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Folate, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Vitamin B6,

1 cup Ice Milk Calories 130.0, Fat 2.0g, Carb 27.0g, Protein 0.0g, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A,E,K,D,

1 Egg Calories 30.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 1.0g, Protein 6.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Vitamin A, Vitamin E Vitamin K, Vitamin D,

1 Grapefruit Calories 110.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 43.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(thiamine), Vitamin B6(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E,

1 oz. White Tea Calories 0.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Vitamin C,K,E,

Midmorning snack: 1 oz. Almonds Calories 170.0, Fat 15.0g, Carbs 2.0g, Protein 6.1g, vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Vitamin E, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium,Iron, Selenium, Zinc, Manganese Copper,

Lunch; 1 cup Wheat-grain Pasta Calories 168.0, Fat 0.8g, Carb 32.8g, Protein 5.6g, Magnesium, Iron, Calcium, Potassium, Zinc,Vitamin E, B6,K,

1 cup Steamed Broccoli Calories 50.0, Fat 0.0g, Carb 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Sodium, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Folate, Vitamin K, E,

4 oz Chicken Breast Calories 100.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 22.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

¼ tsp Sea Salt Calories 28, Fat 1.6g, Carb 3.2g, Protein .4g, Chloride, Sodium, Sulfate, Magnesium, Calcium, Potassium,

½ cup Blueberries Calories 41.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 10.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

Midafternoon snack: 8 med Strawberries Calories 45.0, Fat 0.0, Carbs 12.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, C, E, K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

½ cup Peanuts Calories 360, Fat 22.0g, Carbs 46.0g, Protein 14g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium,

Dinner; 1 serving Wild Alaskan Salmon Calories 245.0, Fat 14.0g, Carbs 1.0g, Protein 30.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, B12, A, Folate,

½ cup Basmatic Rice Calories 160, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 35.0g, Protein 4.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic, Acid, Vitamin B6,A,E,K, Folate,

½ Cup Asparagus Calories 25.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 4.0g, Protein 2.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Magnesium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C,B6,K,E, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

1 piece Hershey’s Bliss Dark Chocolate Calories 33.0, Fat 2.0g, Carbs 4.0g, Protein 0.0g, Vitamin A, Iron,

Total Calories 1,845, Total Fat 60.4g, Total Carbs 246.2g, Total Protein 95.1g

Monday:

Breakfast; 1 Wholegrain Pancake Calories 120.0, Fat 0.5g, Carb 26.0g, Protein 4.0g, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Iron, Calcium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Manganese, Zinc,

16.9 fl oz. Green Tea Calories 0.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Vitamin C,K,E,

1 cup of whole milk Calories 150.0, Fat 8.0g, Carbs 11.0g, Protein 8.0g, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A,E,K,D,

½ cup Blueberries Calories 41.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 10.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

8 med Strawberries Calories 45.0, Fat 0.0, Carbs 12.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, C, E, K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

Midmorning snack:½ oz. Cheese Calories 80.0, Fat 5.0g, Carb 0.0g, Protein 8.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

1 Small Green Apple Calories 36.0, Fat 0.5g, Carbs 21.0g, Protein 0.4g, Potassium, Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Manganese, Iron, Sodium, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic, Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

Peanut butter Calories 90.0, Fat 8.0g, Carb 3.0g, Protein 3.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium,

Lunch; ½ cup Adzuki Beans Calories 294.0, Fat 0.2g, Carbs 57.0g. Protein 17.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Selenium, Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, A

2 oz. Lean Beef Calories 80.0, Fat 4.6g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 10.6g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, E, K, D,

½ cup Brown Rice Calories 75, Fat .5g, Carbs 16.5g, Protein 2.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic, Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate,

¼ cup of Green Beans Calories 25.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 6.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin C, A,B6, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

1 cup Steamed Broccoli Calories 50.0, Fat 0.0g, Carb 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Sodium, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Folate, Vitamin K, E,

1 cup Grapes Calories 87.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 23.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, B6, C, E, K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

Midafternoon snack: 36 Walnuts Calories 6.1, Fat 0.5, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 0.1g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, B6,A,E,K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic, Acid, Folate,

1 Pomegranate Calories 28.3, Fat 0.3g, Carbs 5.5g, Protein 0.8g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

Dinner: 4 oz Chicken Breast Calories 100.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 22.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, B12, A, E, K, D, Folate,

1 cup Wheat-grain Pasta Calories 168.0, Fat 0.8g, Carb 32.8g, Protein 5.6g, Magnesium, Iron, Calcium, Potassium, Zinc,Vitamin E, B6,K,

1 oz Steamed Carrots Calories 9.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 2.0g, Protein 0.3g, Potassium,Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, K, E,

36 Almonds Calories 40.0, Fat 3.5g, Carb 1.0g, Protein 1.0g, vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Vitamin E, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium,Iron, Selenium, Zinc, Manganese Copper,

Peach Calories 91, Fat 0.2g, Carbs 15.8g, Protein 0.8g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

1 Corn on the Cob Calories 90.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 19.0g, Protein 3.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Sodium, Calcium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin C,A,K,E, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Nicain, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

1 Grapefruit Calories 110.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 43.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(thiamine), Vitamin B6(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E,

Total Calories 1,815.4, Total Fat 34.6g, Total Carbs 338.9g, Total Protein 94.3g

Tuesday:

Breakfast; Peanut butter Calories 90.0, Fat 8.0g, Carb 3.0g, Protein 3.0g,Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium,

2 slice Whole Wheat Bread Calories 278.0, Fat 2.0g, Carb 52.0g, Protein 6.0g, Manganese, Selenium, Magnesium, Copper, Iron, Sodium, Vitamin B1(thiamine), Niacin, Folate,

1 Egg Calories 30.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 1.0g, Protein 6.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Vitamin A, Vitamin E Vitamin K, Vitamin D,

1 oz Orange Juice Calories 13.8, Fat 0.0, Carbs 3.3g, Protein 0.3g, Potassium, Sodium, Vitamin C, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamin), Folate, Vitamin A, Calcium, Iron,

1 cup Black Raspberries Calories 64.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 15.0g, Protein 2.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A,B6,C,E,K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

½ cup Blueberries Calories 41.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 10.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

2 tablespoons Flax Seed Calories 10.6, Fat 0.6g, Carbs 0.6g, Protein 0.4g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin, E, K,

Midmorning snack:1 Small Green Apple Calories 36.0, Fat 0.5g, Carbs 21.0g, Protein 0.4g,Potassium, Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Manganese, Iron, Sodium, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic, Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

1 Avocado Calories 322.0, Fat 30.0g, Carbs 17.0g, Protein 4.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A,C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, E, K,

1 Egg Calories 30.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 1.0g, Protein 6.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Vitamin A, Vitamin E Vitamin K, Vitamin D,

1 cup of whole milk Calories 150.0, Fat 8.0g, Carbs 11.0g, Protein 8.0g, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A,E,K,D,

Lunch; 1 cup Yogurt Calories 70.0, Fat 0.0g, Carb 19.0g, Protein 5.0g, Calcium, Potassuim, Phosphorus, Vitamin A, Vitamin B

8 med Strawberries Calories 45.0, Fat 0.0, Carbs 12.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, C, E, K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

1 Baked Potato Calories 110, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin C, B6, A, K, E, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Pantothenic Acid,

4 oz Chicken Breast Calories 100.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 22.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, B12, A, E, K, D, Folate,

1 cup Steamed Broccoli Calories 50.0, Fat 0.0g, Carb 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Sodium, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Folate, Vitamin K, E,

½ cup Quinoa Calories 185.0, Fat 3.0g, Carbs 34.0g, Protein 6.0g, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Folic Acid, Vitamin C, Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Potassium, Copper,

Midafternoon snack: 2 Celery sticks Calories 0.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Cpper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin C,A,K,E,B6, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

Peanut butter Calories 90.0, Fat 8.0g, Carb 3.0g, Protein 3.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium,

3 large slice Cheese Cheddar, Swiss, other hard cheese Calories 9.9, Fat 0.6g, Carbs 0.3g, Protein 0.6g,Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

1 cup cauliflower Calories 34.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 7.0g, Protein 4.0g, , Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin C, B6, A, K, E, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

36 Walnuts Calories 6.1, Fat 0.5, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 0.1g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, B6,A,E,K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic, Acid, Folate,

Dinner; 2 oz. Herring Fish Calories 44.8, Fat 2.8g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 5.6g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

½ cup Brown Rice Calories 75, Fat .5g, Carbs 16.5g, Protein 2.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic, Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate,

2/3 cup Spinach Calories 6.7, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 1.0g, Protein 0.7g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin C, B6, A, K, E, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

1 Grapefruit Calories 110.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 43.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(thiamine), Vitamin B6(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E,

1 piece Hershey’s Bliss Dark Chocolate Calories 33.0, Fat 2.0g, Carbs 4.0g, Protein 0.0g, Vitamin A, Iron,

Total Calorie 1,934.9, Total Fat 68.5, Total Carbs 273.7, Total Protein 88.8

Wednesday:

Breakfast; 1 Egg Calories 30.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 1.0g, Protein 6.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Vitamin A, Vitamin E Vitamin K, Vitamin D,

1 Tbs butter Calories 50.0, Fat 5.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Vitamin A, D, E, Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Iodine,

1 Wholegrain Bagel Calories 270.0, Fat 2.0g, Carb 56.0g, Protein 11.0g, Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc, Iron, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folic Acid, Vitamin B6, E,

2 slices Smoked Wild Boar Bacon Calories 4.3, Fat 0.3g, Carbs 0.1g, Protein 0.4g, Sodium, Iron,

Midmorning snack: 1 cup Black Raspberries Calories 64.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 15.0g, Protein 2.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A,B6,C,E,K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

½ cup Peanuts Calories 360, Fat 22g, Carbs 46g, Protein 14g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium,

Lunch; ½ oz. Cheese Calories 80.0, Fat 5.0g, Carb 0.0g, Protein 8.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

4 oz. Wild Alaskan Cod Calories 90.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 20.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Mangnese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C,B6,B12,A,E,K,D, Vitamin B1(Thiamin), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

½ cup Beets Calories 51, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 17.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Folate, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6,K, E,

1 cup chopped Kale Calories 96.1, Fat 7.3g, Carbs 7.3g, Protein 2.5g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Vitamin B6, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,Vitamin K, E,

slice Whole Wheat Bread Calories 139.0, Fat 1.0g, Carb 26.0g, Protein 3.0g, Manganese, Selenium, Magnesium, Copper, Iron, Sodium, Vitamin B1(thiamine), Niacin, Folate,

Midafternoon snack: 1 cup Nectarine slices Calories 44.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 11.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A,B6,C,E,K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

1 Pear Calories 0.5, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 0.1g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A,B6,C,E,K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin)

1 oz. Soy Nuts Calories 130.0, Fat 6.0g, Carbs 9.0g, Protein 12.0g, Folate, Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Vitamin K, Manganese, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Copper, Potassium, Iron, Calcium, Zinc, Selenium,

Dinner;4 oz Chicken Breast Calories 100.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 22.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

1 cup Dark Red Kidney Beans Calories 220.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 30.0g, Protein 14.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, B6, E, K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

½ cup Brussel Sprouts Calories 25, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 4.5g, Protein 1.5g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Sodium, Vitamin C, B6, A, E, K, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

1 cup Mixed Berries Calories 80.0, Fat 0.5g, Carbs 20.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, B6, C, E, K, Vitmain B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

Total Calories 1,833.9, Total Fat 52.1, Total Carbs 243, Total Protein 110.4

Thursday:

Breakfast; 1 cup of whole milk Calories 150.0, Fat 8.0g, Carbs 11.0g, Protein 8.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A,E,K,D,

½ cup Granola Calories 373.1, Fat 14.9g, Carbs 53.7, Protein 9.0g, Zinc, Iron, Vitamin E, Folate, Vitamin B

36 Almonds Calories 40.0, Fat 3.5g, Carb 1.0g, Protein 1.0g, vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Vitamin E, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium,Iron, Selenium, Zinc, Manganese Copper,

2 tablespoons Flax Seed Calories 10.6, Fat 0.6g, Carbs 0.6g, Protein 0.4g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin, E, K,

Midmorning snack: 1 cup Yogurt Calories 70.0, Fat 0.0g, Carb 19.0g, Protein 5.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin, C, A, E, K, D, B12, B6, Vitamin, B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

1 cup Mixed Berries Calories 80.0, Fat 0.5g, Carbs 20.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, B6, C, E, K, Vitmain B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

Lunch: 1 serving Wild Alaskan Salmon Calories 245.0, Fat 14.0g, Carbs 1.0g, Protein 30.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, B12, A, Folate,

1 cup Wheat-grain Pasta Calories 168.0, Fat 0.8g, Carb 32.8g, Protein 5.6g, Magnesium, Iron, Calcium, Potassium, Zinc,Vitamin E, B6,K,

1 cup Steamed Broccoli Calories 50.0, Fat 0.0g, Carb 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Sodium, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Folate, Vitamin K, E,

Dinner: 2 oz. Herring Fish Calories 89.6, Fat 5.6g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 11.2, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

½ Cup Asparagus Calories 25.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 4.0g, Protein 2.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Magnesium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C,B6,K,E, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

¼ cup of Green Beans Calories 25.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 6.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin C, A,B6, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

1 Pear Calories 0.5, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 0.1g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, B6, C, E, K, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

1 serving Chickpeas Calories 187, Fat 1.7g, Carbs 39.1g, Protein 5.5g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin A, E, K,

1 piece Hershey’s Bliss Dark Chocolate Calories 33.0, Fat 2.0g, Carbs 4.0g, Protein 0.0g, Vitamin A, Iron,

1 oz Fresh Mozzarella Cheese Calories 80.0, Fat 6.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 5.0g, Calcium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Chloride, Iron, Sodium, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Biotin, Vitamin B6, A, D, E,

Total Calories 1,626.8, Total Fat 57.6,Total Carbs 192.3, Total Protein 78.7

Friday:

Breakfast; 1 Wholegrain Pancake Calories 120.0, Fat 0.5g, Carb 26.0g, Protein 4.0g, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Iron, Calcium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Manganese, Zinc,

1 serving Cherry Calories 51.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 13.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Vitamin A, B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

1 cup of whole milk Calories 150.0, Fat 8.0g, Carbs 11.0g, Protein 8.0g, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A,E,K,D,

1 oz. White Tea Calories 0.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Vitamin C,K,E,

Midmorning snack: 1 cup Yogurt Calories 70.0, Fat 0.0g, Carb 19.0g, Protein 5.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin, C, A, E, K, D, B12, B6, Vitamin, B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

Peach Calories 91, Fat 0.2g, Carbs 15.8g, Protein 0.8g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

2 tablespoons Flax Seed Calories 10.6, Fat 0.6g, Carbs 0.6g, Protein 0.4g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin, E, K,

Lunch; 4 oz Chicken Breast Calories 100.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 22.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

1 cup Wheat-grain Pasta Calories 168.0, Fat 0.8g, Carb 32.8g, Protein 5.6g, Magnesium, Iron, Calcium, Potassium, Zinc,Vitamin E, B6,K,

½ cup Adzuki Beans Calories 294.0, Fat 0.2g, Carbs 57.0g. Protein 17.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Selenium, Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, A,

1 oz Steamed Carrots Calories 9.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 2.0g, Protein 0.3g, Potassium,Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, K, E,

1 Avocado Calories 322.0, Fat 30.0g, Carbs 17.0g, Protein 4.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin, A, C, B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, E, K,

Midafternoon snack: 1 Small Green Apple Calories 36.0, Fat 0.5g, Carbs 21.0g, Protein 0.4g, Potassium, Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Manganese, Iron, Sodium, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic, Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

½ oz. Cheese Calories 80.0, Fat 5.0g, Carb 0.0g, Protein 8.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

Dinner: 2 oz. Lean Beef Calories 80.0, Fat 4.6g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 10.6g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, E, K, D,

½ cup Brown Rice Calories 75, Fat .5g, Carbs 16.5g, Protein 2.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic, Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate,

1/2 cup Kale Slivered Carrots stir fried Calories 77.0, Fat 3.0g, Carbs 12.0g, Protein 3.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), B6, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin K, E,

1 cup Steamed Broccoli Calories 50.0, Fat 0.0g, Carb 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Sodium, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Folate, Vitamin K, E,

1 glass of Red Wine Calories 125, Fat 0.0 Carbs 3.8g, Protein 0.1g, Calcium, Magnesium, Choline,

1oz. Pomegranate Calories 23.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 5.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

1 cup Mixed Berries Calories 80.0, Fat 0.5g, Carbs 20.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, B6, C, E, K, Vitmain B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Folate,

Total Calories 2,022.6, Total Fat 55.4, Total Carbs 282.5, Total Protein 89.2

Saturday:

Breakfast; 1 cup Buckwheat Groats Calories 155.0, Fat 1.0g, Carbs 33.0g, Protein 6.0g, Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc, Niacin, Cholrine, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin B,

1 serving Cherry Calories 51.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 13.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Vitamin A, B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

1 cup of whole milk Calories 150.0, Fat 8.0g, Carbs 11.0g, Protein 8.0g, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A,E,K,D,

½ cup Blueberries Calories 41.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 10.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

2 tablespoons Flax Seed Calories 10.6, Fat 0.6g, Carbs 0.6g, Protein 0.4g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin, E, K,

Midmorning snack: 1 Small Green Apple Calories 36.0, Fat 0.5g, Carbs 21.0g, Protein 0.4g, Potassium, Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Manganese, Iron, Sodium, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic, Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

2 Eggs Calories 199.0, Fat 15.0g, Carb 2.0g, Protein 13.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Vitamin A, Vitamin E Vitamin K, Vitamin D,

Lunch; 2 oz. Lean Beef Calories 80.0, Fat 4.6g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 10.6g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Manganese, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, E, K, D,

1 cup Spaghetti Sauce Calories 120.0, Fat 2.0g, Carbs 24.0g, Protein 0.0g, Calcium, Copper, Folate, Iron, Magnesium, Niacin, Phosphorus, Zinc, Vitamin C, A, B6, B12, E,

1 oz Steamed Carrots Calories 9.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 2.0g, Protein 0.3g, Potassium,Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, K, E,

1 cup Wheat-grain Pasta Calories 168.0, Fat 0.8g, Carb 32.8g, Protein 5.6g, Magnesium, Iron, Calcium, Potassium, Zinc,Vitamin E, B6,K,

1 cup of Green Beans Calories 100.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 24.0g, Protein 4.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin C, A,B6, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

Midafternoon snack: 2 Corn on the Cob Calories 180.0, Fat 2.0g, Carbs 38.0g, Protein 6.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Sodium, Calcium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin C,A,K,E, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Nicain, Folate, Pantothenic Acid,

Orange Calories 24.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 5.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E,

1 oz. White Tea Calories 0.0, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 0.0g, Vitamin C,K,E,

Dinner: 2 oz. Herring Fish Calories 89.6, Fat 5.6g, Carbs 0.0g, Protein 11.2, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

½ cup Basmatic Rice Calories 160, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 35.0g, Protein 4.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), Vitamin B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic, Acid, Vitamin B6,A,E,K, Folate,

Peach Calories 41.0, Fat 0.2g, Carbs 11.0g, Protein 1.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Selenium, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Vitamin A, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, C, E, K,

½ oz. Cheese Calories 80.0, Fat 5.0g, Carb 0.0g, Protein 8.0g, Protein 8.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Sodium, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, A, E, K, D,

½ cup Beets Calories 51, Fat 0.0g, Carbs 17.0g, Protein 0.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Folate, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B6,K, E,

1/2 cup Kale Slivered Carrots stir fried Calories 77.0, Fat 3.0g, Carbs 12.0g, Protein 3.0g, Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium, Vitamin A,C, Niacin, Vitamin B1(Thiamine), B2(Riboflavin), B6, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin K, E,

1 glass of Red Wine Calories 125, Fat 0.0 Carbs 3.8g, Protein 0.1g, Calcium, Magnesium, Choline,

Total Calories 1,847.2, Total Fat 53.9g, Total Carbs 260.2g, Total Protein 87.8g

Module 1 Lesson 8 (Naturally Healthy Community Herbalist A Course of Study)

Lesson 8 Study Questions and Answers

  1. What type of diet creates a higher calcium need? A high protein diet creates a higher calcium need.
  2. What is a less well-known effect of chromium supplementation (other than blood sugar control? Chromium can be taken to reduce the risk of heart disease.
  3. A diet high in fructose can create a deficiency in what mineral? Copper
  4. What class of foods blocks iodide entry into the thyroid, resulting in decreasing thyroid hormone production? How do we inactivate these food chemicals? Goitrogen-containing foods including broccoli, lake, cauliflower, rutabaga, turnips, brussels sprouts, and mustard greens. The goitrogens can be inactivared by cooking these vegetables.
  5. What should one look at in diet and supplementation if a client is low in iron? Eating more foods with iron in it such as; liver, round stake, hamburger, spinach, lima beans, peas black eyed, prune juice, apricots dried, prunes, breakfast cereal, oatmeal, bagel, English muffin.
  6. Magnesium, along with what other minerals, affects the muscle tone of our blood vessels? Magnesium along with calcium sodium and potassium, affect the muscle tone of our blood vessels.
  7. What are some benefits of selenium supplementation? Selenium’s most important function in the body is as an antioxidant. Selenium is a necessary component of the antioxidant enzyme called glutathione peroxidase, which inactivates free-radical substances such as hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides. Selenium also seems to be incorporated into an enzyme, deiodinase, which is involved in iodide metabolism.
  8. What is the best dietary strategy for avoiding excess sodium levels? Since sodium occurs naturally in foods, we need to make sure we don’t over do our sodium.
  9. What lifestyle factors can lead to zinc deficiency? Calories restricting diets, vegetarianism, alcoholism, excessive exercise and cigarette smoking all can lead to zinc deficiency.
  10. Choose the mineral you knew least about when starting this lesson. Write two paragraphs about it using at least one other source of additional information. Phosphorous

Phosphorous is a mineral that helps bones and soft tissue grow healthy. Phosphorous works with calcium in this area. Phosphorous also helps balance the B vitamins and calcium out. Also helps muscles to grow properly and nerves to function well. It helps sicknesses such as constipation, kidney stones, and high blood calcium levels.

If you don’t get enough phosphorous your muscles will become weak, impairment of heart contraction. Confusion, seizures, and comas could also happen. In our diets we have some much phosphorous that it is very rare to have deficiency.

Source: http://www.drweil.com, naturally healthy community herbalist A course of Study. 

Mineral Chart

Type

Benefits

Deficiency

Toxicity

Vitamin/mineral block

Depleted by processing foods

Sources

calcium

Calcium is vital for building strong bones and teeth. The time to build strong bones is during childhood and the teen years, so it’s very important to get enough calcium now to fight against bone loss later in life. Weak bones are susceptible to a condition called osteoporosis, which causes bones to break easily.

A calcium deficiency results in bone abnormthealities. If the deficiency is present during the growing year, bone will not be adequately mineralized. Instead, they will become soft and pliable. Bowed legs are common in calcium deficiency. If the calcium deficiency occurs later in life, the bones will be less dense and more susceptible to fracturewe call this condition osteomalacia.

In a individual, calcium toxicity is a very rare occurrence. A balanced diet does not contain enough calcium to result in toxic levels within the bloodstream. Aside from vitamin D, the body produces two hormones, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin, that regulate the amount of calcium outside of the skeletal structure. Parathyroid hormones release calcium from the bones when levels are low in the blood stream, and calcitonin stops calcium discharge when levels are excessive.

Vitamin C, aids in absorption of non-heme iron and even counteracts the inhibitory effects of calcium on that process.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/449565-can-you-take-other-vitamins-while-taking-calcium/#ixzz2EhGAUKSc

When sodium intake becomes too high, the body gets rid of sodium via the urine, taking calcium with it, which depletes calcium stores in the body. 

Milk and other dairy products — such as yogurt, cheese, and cottage cheese — are good sources of calcium. You’ll also find this mineral in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables. Soy foods and foods fortified with calcium, including some kinds of orange juice and soy milk, are also good sources.

Iron

Iron helps red blood cells carry oxygen to all parts of the body. Symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include weakness and fatigue, lightheadedness, and shortness of breath.

Symptoms of iron deficiency anemina includes: irritability, paleness, intolerance to cold, and a general sense of lack of well-being. Iron deficiency can also impair brain function, particularly the right hemisphere of the brain. This impairment can manifest as cognitive impairment, poor attention span, restlessness, and the inability to concentrate.

Iron supplementation is not safe for individuals with any iron storage disorder such as hemosiderosis, idiopathic hemochromatosis, or thalassemias. In addition, iron overdose is common in the home.

Zinc taken in supplement form at higher levels, along with iron, has been shown to block iron absorption, but not when consumed together in a meal. Calcium taken in supplement form at a level of 300 mg to 600 mg, can block iron absorption up to 50 percent or 60 percen

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/422583-what-blocks-iron-in-the-body/#ixzz2EhIRDy00

Tannins, found in plants, can block iron absorption. You get tannins, a type of polyphenol, from black tea, red wine, chocolate and some fruits, such as blueberries. Green tea and coffee contain smaller amounts. 

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/486678-foods-that-deplete-iron-from-the-body/#ixzz2EhwPGLnI

Iron-rich foods include red meat, pork, fish and shellfish, poultry, lentils, beans and soy foods, green leafy vegetables, and raisins. Some flours, cereals, and grain products are also fortified with iron.

Magnesium

Magnesium helps muscles and nerves function, steadies the heart rhythm, and keeps bones strong. It also helps the body create energy and make proteins.

A deficiency of magnesium may manifest with tremors, muscle spasms, convulsions, neurchiatric disturbances, coronary artery disease, angina pectoris, cardiac arrhythmias, and hypertension. Another deficiency in magnesium directly and indirectly affects cardiac function through its effect on potassium, sodium, and calcium concentrations in cells and surrounding fluids.

Toxicity caused by high dietary intake of magnesium can be somewhat offset by kidneys that are healthy and functioning well.

Magnesium, copper, iron and calcium all compete for absorption, so too much of one can lead to low blood levels of the others.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/242626-do-some-vitamins-inhibit-absorption-of-other-vitamins/#ixzz2EoCLC457

When you eat foods containing oxalic acid, this substance can interfere with the absorption of minerals in those foods, such as calcium, magnesium and potassium. Oxalic acid also can combine with minerals in the body, creating oxalate crystals that may cause problems for people prone to kidney stones or gout. Leafy green vegetables contain high amounts of oxalic acid, also beans, star fruit, buckwheat, almonds, cashews, black and white pepper, poppyseeds and ginger.
Read more: 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/84477-oxalic-acid-foods/#ixzz2EoGIrcxO

You get magnesium from whole grains and whole-grain breads, nuts and seeds, green leafy vegetables, potatoes, beans, avocados, bananas, milk, and chocolate (yes, chocolate!).

Phosphorus

Phosphorus helps form healthy bones and teeth. It also helps the body make energy. It is part of every cell membrane, and every cell in the body needs phosphorus to function normally.

Our diets are so rich in this mineral that deficiency is extremely rare. However, a vitamin D deficiency may reduce our absorption of phosphorus

The one exception to rare toxicity in regards to phosphorus would be babies drinking a high phosphorus- containing infant formula. Most commercially available infant formulas do not have excessive phosphorus content, which would be a toxicity risk.

Although we absorb about 70 to 80 percent of phosphorus from food, other components from our diet can interfere with the absorption process. Phytates often found in grains, magnesium, iron and other minerals compete for the same absorption site as phosphorus and can hinder the process.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/454517-calcium-phosphorus-absorption/#ixzz2EoK5W7Yx

(a) inhibition of phosphorus absorption by binders involves a complex interplay between chemical reactions and ion

transport processes in the stomach and small intestine; (b)

theoretical and in vitro studies can identify potentially better in

vivo phosphorus binders; and (c) calcium acetate, not previously used for medical purposes, is approximately as efficient as aluminum carbonate gel and more efficient as a phosphorus binder than other currently used calcium salts. Reduction of Dietary Phosphorus Absorption by Phosphorus Binders

Phosphorus is found in most foods, but the best sources are dairy foods, meat, and fish.

Potassium

Potassium helps with muscle and nervous system function. It also helps the body maintain the balance of water in the blood and body tissues.

When we lose sodium with water from our body, the greatest damage occurs when potasium moeves out of the cells with cell water. Long-term use of laxative results in decreased absorption of potassium in the digestive tract, thus someone requiring laxative use needs to be monitored for potassium deficiency. People who vomit after meals, either voluntarily or involuntarily, as well as those on a very low calorie diet are also at risk for potassium deficiency

Potassium toxicity is not a concern unless the kidneys are not functioning properly. Elevated blood potassium levels causes a condition called hyperkalemia, which would definitely affect the proper functioning of the excitable tissue, especially the heart and brain.

Minerals including potassium are usually absorbed in ionic form. If they are not in ionic form when consumed, they are ionized in the gut, with salts dissolving into their two components or chelates releasing their key elements. http://www.westonaprice.org

When you eat foods containing oxalic acid, this substance can interfere with the absorption of minerals in those foods, such as calcium, magnesium and potassium. Oxalic acid also can combine with minerals in the body, creating oxalate crystals that may cause problems for people prone to kidney stones or gout. Leafy green vegetables contain high amounts of oxalic acid, also beans, star fruit, buckwheat, almonds, cashews, black and white pepper, poppyseeds and ginger.
Read more: 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/84477-oxalic-acid-foods/#ixzz2EoGIrcxO

Potassium is found in broccoli, potatoes (with skins), green leafy vegetables, citrus fruits, bananas, dried fruits, and legumes such as peas and lima beans.

Zinc

Zinc is important for normal growth, strong immunity, and wound healing.

Calories restricting diets, vegetarianism, alcoholism, excessive exercise, and cigarette smoking all can lead to Zinc deficiency. Physical stress or injury may lead to zinc deficiency, as well as chronic psychological stress. Zinc is one of the few minerals lost rapidly when the body is placed in chronic stressful situations, which can lead to zinc deficiency even with adequate RDA. Insufficient zinc has many effects on the immune system, particularly T-lymphocytes, decreased number and activity of killer cells, and impaired antibody production.

Zinc toxicity may manifest as gastrointestinal irritation, comiting, adverse changes in HDL/LDL choesterol ratios, and impaired immunity. Impaired immunity ovvurs when zinc levels are above 180mg/day of supplementation for more than several weeks.

Dietary fiber is a part of wheat and vegetables that is not typically well digested. Excessive fiber in the diet can inhibit the absorption of zinc by binding to it. This makes the zinc unavailable to the body and it passes out of the body through the intestines. Many grain products, which are high in fiber, also contain phytic acid, which inhibits the absorption of zinc.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/37132-foods-block-zinc-absorption/#ixzz2EhxUdubD

Zinc inhibits both copper and iron; magnesium, copper, iron and calcium all compete for absorption, so too much of one can lead to low blood levels of the others.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/242626-do-some-vitamins-inhibit-absorption-of-other-vitamins/#ixzz2EoU28y3e

You’ll find zinc in red meat, poultry, oysters and other seafood, nuts, dried beans, soy foods, milk and other dairy products, whole grains, and fortified breakfast cereals.

Boron

According to Medline Plus, boron is beneficial for regulating hormones, preventing osteoarthritis, reducing symptoms of menopause, preventing blood clots, reducing psoriasis and increasing testosterone.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/242015-foods-high-in-boron-vitamins/#ixzz2EoWAUoCg

Boron deficiency in little chicks results in a syndrome that resembles human arthritis. Other human studies show evidence that optimal intakes of boron can enhance memory and cognitive function, as well as perhaps an association between sufficient boron intake and resistance to dental caries(tooth decay).

If excessive amounts of boron are taken, it may result in nausea, vomiting, lethargy, and an increased loss of riboflavin.

Boron helps in absorption of magnesium, calcium and vitamin D. When other minerals such as phoshorous compete with magnesium, calcium and vitamin D it can cause a lack of boron too, since boron works with them to help absorb.

To ensure you have enough boron in your diet consume a variety from among the following food sources: almonds, walnuts, avocados, broccoli, potatoes, pears, prunes, honey, oranges, onions, chick peas, carrots, beans, bananas, red grapes, red apples and raisins.
Read more: 
http://www.livestrong.com/article/242015-foods-high-in-boron-vitamins/#ixzz2EoWAUoCg

chromium

Chromium is a mineral that aids in the body’s ability to use insulin to convert carbohydrates to energy, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Claims that supplementing with chromium helps treat diabetes, heart disease and obesity have not been conclusively verified. 

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/515017-chromium-is-found-in-what-foods/#ixzz2EolRAPUN

Studies on people with heart disease have demonstratedthat chromium deficiency is associated with atherosclerosis. Tissues of people who have died of heart disease have been found to have less chromium than tissues of people who died of accidental causes. In patients who died of heart disease with atherosclerotic plaque, there was no detectable chromium found in those tissues.

The safety of chromium supplement ation has been well established. Even in pharmacological(medicinal) doses of 50-1,000mg/day for 1-3 months, no toxicity has been noted in cats, rats or mice.

Chromium seems to work together with most other minerals to help the effects on blood cholesteral and triglyceride levels.

Avoid products made with excess sugar, as simple sugars do not contain chromium and may actually decrease amounts of chromium in the body, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. One average-size waffle has approximately 6.7 mcg of chromium and one whole-wheat English muffin contains 4 mcg. A bagel provides 2.5 mcg of chromium, while two slices of whole-wheat bread contain 2 mcg.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/515017-chromium-is-found-in-what-foods/#ixzz2EombVEtE

Chromium is found in lean meats, cheese, organ meats, such as prok kidneys. Also in many fruits and veggetables, such as mushrooms, asparagus and prunes. It is in most grains such as bran cereals, but avoid products made with excess sugar.

copper

Your body needs trace amounts of copper for healthy red blood cell formation, nerve function and connective tissue production.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/copper-supplements/#ixzz2EoqTA5qQ

A deficiency of magnesium may manifest with tremors, muscle spasms, convulsions, neurchiatric disturbances, coronary artery disease, angina pectoris, cardiac arrhythmias, and hypertension. Another deficiency in magnesium directly and indirectly affects cardiac function through its effect on potassium, sodium, and calcium concentrations in cells and surrounding fluids.

Wilson’s disease is a rare genetic form of copper toxicity induced by increased copper storage.

Excess levels of zinc may either lower copper levels or aggravate a marginal copper deficiency.

Foods with plenty copper in them would be: livver, beef, cashews, black-eyed peas, molasses, blackstrap, sunflower seeds, V8 drink, tofu firm, beans refried, cocoa powder, prunes dried, salmon, pizza cheese, whole wheat bread, chocolate milk and milk

Iodine

Iodine accumulates in thyroid tissue and is necessary to combine with the amino acid thyrosine for the body to produce thyroxine and triiodothyronine, the hormones of the thyroid gland.

The most common cause of endemic goiter(enlargement of the thyroid gland) and cretinism is iodine deficiency. If a child is deficient in iodide during the growth years, poor growth, poor maturing of the organs and mental deficits may result.

In large amounts, iodine disturbs all thyroid function.

There is a class of substances called goitrogens that may block iodide entry into the thyroid gland. Goitrogen-containing foods include broccoli, lake cauliflower, rutabaga, turnips, brussel sprouts, and mustard greens. The goitrogens can be inactivated by cooking these vegetables.

Cheese
Cows milk
Eggs 
Frozen Yogurt 
Ice Cream
Iodine-containing multivitamins
Iodized table salt 
Saltwater fish 
Seaweed (including kelp, dulce, nori)
Shellfish
Soy milk 
Soy sauce 
Yogurt http://www.thyroid.org

manganese

The primary role of manganese is as a coenzyme in a variety of metabolic processes. It helps the body produce energy from foods, and it is also involved in thyroid function and bone formation. In addition, manganese is involved in immune system function, and it can help to heal muscular strains and sprains. http://vitamins.ultimatefatburner.com

If we consume a diet high in refined carbohydrates, we may be deficient in mangese. If we supplement with iron in our diet, we can depress manganese retention if iron nourishment is poor. Manganese deficiency is rare but may result in nausea, vomiting, dematitis, dermatitis, decreased growth of hair and nails, and changes to hair color.

Just as deficiency is rare, thus is toxicity, although miners inhaling mananese-rich dust can experience Parkinson’s like symptoms.

Other factors include malabsorption, antacid or oral contraceptive use that interfere with its absorption, excessive sweating because large amounts of manganese is lost in sweating, excess iron, copper or magnesium because they deplete manganese, and chronic liver or gallbladder disorders, which raise intake requirements.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/485034-the-symptoms-of-manganese-deficiency/#ixzz2Erf6dv00

Foods that contain phytic acid, such as beans, seeds, nuts, whole grains and soy products, or foods high in oxalic acid, such as cabbage, sweet potatoes, and cabbage, can moderately inhibit manganese absorption.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/485034-the-symptoms-of-manganese-deficiency/#ixzz2ErfG9pSG

Foods with manganese: Spelt, brown rice, garbanzo beans, spinach, pineapple, pumpkin seeds, tempeh, rye, soybeans, and oats.

selenium

Your body only requires small amounts of selenium to maintain good health. Selenium plays a part in regulating thyroid function and the immune system. It is also used in industrial processes.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/540787-selenium-headaches/#ixzz2ErgeMswb

Selenium deficiency has been determined to be the cause of keshan disease, which is an enlargement and abnormal functioning of the heart and eventual heart failure.

Toxicity symptoms including hair and nail loss, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty in proper pretein manufacturing in the body.

Things that don’t help selenium function would be infections, injury stress, blood loss and old age. http://www.theherbsplace.com

Foods that deplete the process of selenium are: food processing, high fat foods. http://www.theherbsplace.com

Certain nuts and seeds have a rich amount of selenium, also certain types of fish and meat products and eggs.

Sodium/sodium chloride

Sodium functions with chloride and bicarbonate to maintain a balance of positive and negative ions (electrically charged particles) in our body fluids and tissues. The body receives sodium primarily in the form of table salt (sodium chloride). Sodium, the principal extracellular ion, has the property of holding water in body tissues. 

http://www.vitamins-nutrition.org

A sodium deficiency can result in just one to twwo days of consuming a very low sodium diet combined with excessive sweating and/or chronic diarrhea.

If the kidneys are functioning well, excessive sodium intake should not be a problem; however, anyone consuming a large amount of salt would be well advised to increase their water intake accordingly. If kidneys are experiencing decreased performance, dialysis maybe required to remove excessive sodium and other substances from body fluid.

Potassium can limit some of the toxic effects of excessive sodium intake.

Vomiting, diarrhea, sweating for fever, heat or exercise all deplete the work of sodium. http://www.theherbsplace.com

Salt has a lot of sodium chloride.

http://www.sciencedaily.com

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